First #GiveMe5 campaign raises £25,000 in a day

first_imgFirst #GiveMe5 campaign raises £25,000 in a day About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Online giving platform Localgiving’s #GiveMe5 campaign yesterday raised £25,000 for 365 organisations around the country, in just 24 hours.The matched giving campaign offered to match fund 1,000 £5 donations made to the small or local charities that are listed on Localgiving.com. Unlike other matched giving campaigns, such as that run by The Big Give, the #GiveMe5 campaign was not available on a first-come first-served basis. Instead, the donations that would be matched were selected at random.The campaign focused on £5 donations. Other sums could be donated of course, but they would not be eligible for matching.My donation to a choral society was not matched, I have just learned. But that hasn’t detracted from making the gift.Indeed, #GiveMe5 will return to Localgiving.com for one day next month on 25 February 2015, offering the same chance of doubling your £5 donation.Localgiving has run other matched giving campaigns including Triple Tenner Tuesday to mark Giving Tuesday UK. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 30 January 2015 | News Tagged with: Localgiving matched giving  46 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

Top job

first_imgTheIT consultancy White Clarke Group has appointed Mike Morris to the board as HRdirector.WhiteClarke employs more than 170 people and provides IT expertise and systems toblue-chip companies in the motor industry, including VW, General Motors andNissan.Morris’srole within the group includes responsibility for internal HR issues andproviding HR consultancy to key clients.UnderMorris’s leadership the HR team will also be in charge of organisationaldesign, recruitment and career development and training and developmentMorrishas experience in the financial services industry and his previous experienceincludes HR management positions for leading banks and financial institutions,most recently Barclays Bank.Hesaid, “We are hoping to encourage more people to come into IT as it can be anexciting and challenging career.“Mymain challenge will be to get the right people and build the company fromwithin.“Weare just starting our graduate recruitment process and are hoping to grow our ownstaff. One of my goals will be to get the right balance between male and femalestaff.” Previous Article Next Article Top jobOn 20 Mar 2001 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Stolen book sparks international dispute

first_imgA book worth £15 000 stolen from Christ Church Library has been found in Japan. The 1552 pocket edition of De Humani Corporis Fabrica by the Belgian anatomist Andreas Vesalius is the only book of 73 not recovered from a theft in the early 1990s. The books were all stolen by Simon Heighes, a lecturer who smuggled books out one by one, and later served two years in prison for his offence. The University traced the path of the Vesalius which was first sold on to Sotheby’s by Heighes and bought by an American book-dealer. It was later bought by Shoten Ohi in Tokyo before being privately sold to a Japanese university. Ohi repeatedly ignored letters from Christ Church before he was persuaded to attempt a retrieval of the book. “I’d love to resolve the problem but I don’t like the way Oxford have treated me,” he said. “They treat me like a criminal.” The dispute has turned into a bitter row between the University and Japan. David Morris, Oxford University’s representative in Japan, said: “The case brings shame on the Japanese educational establishment.” Nihon Shika Daigaku, a wealthy private university of dentistry, has acknowledged that it does have a copy of the 1552 book although it has not been confirmed that it once belonged to Christ Church.”ARCHIVE: 0th Week MT2003last_img read more

Three-quarters of card payments in bakeries are contactless

first_imgBakeries have the highest rate of contactless card payments of any merchant type in the UK in 2017, a study has revealed.Almost three-quarters (72%) of card transactions in bakeries, such as Greggs, were contactless, according to the study by card processing specialist Paymentsense. This means nearly 6.4 million transactions in bakeries were completed via a contactless payment.Fast food restaurants came second, with 58.3% of all card payments being contactless, followed by 57.7% in drinking establishments and 54.6% in pharmacies (see list below for the rest of the top 10).Notably, consumers can only pay via contactless for transactions under £30.The study also shows the top 10 cashless and contactless cities in the UK. Perhaps unsurprisingly, London came top, as more than half (57%) of the city’s card payments were contactless. Birmingham was second and Bristol third, followed by Brighton.“As a society, we’re close to becoming cashless, with contactless now making up over 42% of all transactions. There are areas of the UK that are adapting to this movement, but others that haven’t made the list need to improve and move with the times,” said Guy Moreve, head of marketing at Paymentsense. “The study further highlights the average person’s diminishing availability of cash, as many struggle when it comes to everyday, cash-only services, such as car parks and taxis, and the importance of accepting card payments within these businesses.”Contactless payments are most popular with younger generations as 41% of Brits aged 18-24 said it was their favourite form of payment compared to just under 10% of over-55s.last_img read more

Watch Brendan Bayliss & Ryan Stasik Talk Umphrey’s McGee On Local TV News

first_imgWith their performance at Milwaukee’s famed Summerfest last night, two of Umphrey’s McGee’s esteemed members – guitarist Brendan and bassist Ryan Stasik – hit local CBS 58 to talk about their band, their history with Milwaukee and more.Bayliss spoke about the band’s long legacy in Milwaukee, saying, “Being based out of Chicago, we’re very close. And when we started touring, the first city we ever played was Milwaukee.” Stasik followed up by calling their music “self-indulgent, improvisational rock-n-roll.”Watch the short and enjoyable clip below. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream Type LIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedAudio TrackCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Frankly Video Player – v7.36.0CloseCBS 58last_img read more

Metallica Announces Surprise NYC Show After Rocking Global Citizen

first_imgLast night, Metallica descended from the stage at Global Citizen with some very exciting news. Posted on their website, the band wrote:“We just walked off the stage at the Global Citizen show in New York’s Central Park and we had such a blast that we’re going to keep the good vibes rolling by adding another show to our New York run! This Tuesday, September 27th, we’ll be playing a special show for our Fifth Members only at the intimate Webster Hall and if you’re a member you have a chance to pick up tickets and join us.It’s easy… click here to enter to win an opportunity to purchase up to two tickets per member. Tickets will be $25.00 each and all the proceeds will be donated to City Harvest. Hurry! Entries close tomorrow, Sunday, September 25 at 6:45 PM EDT. All winners will be e-mailed a personal code and more details about how to purchase tickets to the exclusive one-of-a-kind show.If you can get to New York City from wherever you are this Tuesday evening and you’re a Fifth Member, check it out now. Hope to see you there!”For more details on how to get your hands on tickets, click here.Metallica’s tenth studio album, Hardwired…To Self-Destruct, is coming out November 18th. The two-disc release contains nearly eighty minutes of music, and is the follow-up to the American heavy metal band’s 2008 Death Magnetic release.Thanks to MSNBC, we can watch footage from the band’s performance last night below: Metallica @ Global Citizen 9/25/16:For Whom The Bell TollsMaster Of PuppetsOneNothing Else MattersEnter Sandmanlast_img read more

Las Vegas Victims Fund To Distribute $31M+ To Survivors, Families Of Victims In Festival Shooting

first_imgOn the evening of October 1st, 2017, during Jason Aldean‘s closing set at Route 91 Harvest Festival in Las Vegas, a gunman opened fire on the crowd gathered on the Strip from the window of an overlooking casino hotel. He continued to fire for roughly an hour as the festival’s audience scrambled for cover. By the time authorities found him dead of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, he had murdered 58 people and injured more than 800 others, making it the most devastating mass shooting in modern American history.Ever since, people from all over banded together to support the countless people whose lives were lost or affected by the attack at the Route 91 Harvest Festival. What began as a GoFundMe campaign quickly ballooned into a full-blown nonprofit organization, The Las Vegas Victims Fund, and eventually pulled in more than $31M in donations.The fund reports receiving more than 90,000 individual donations, with nearly 40% coming from southern Nevada gambling, tourism, and entertainment companies. Students, faculty, and staff at a high school in suburban Henderson raised more than $66,000 through T-shirt sales and a #VegasStrong benefit concert that raised nearly $700,000.As the Associated Press reports, today the Las Vegas Victims Fund announced plans to pay $275,000 to the families of each of the 58 people killed in the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history. The fund also reported that the maximum $275,000 will also be paid to 10 other people who were paralyzed or suffered permanent brain damage in the shooting on the Las Vegas Strip. The fund posted a chart that projects the different donation amounts that will be issued to a total of 532 different people. The donations will be scaled individually based on the extent of the given victim’s medical expenses.Decisions regarding the disbursement of the funds were made by a committee of victim advocates, mental health and medical professionals, lawyers, donors and others, with input from two separate town hall meetings with the victims and their families.Las Vegas Victims Fund spokesman Howard Stutz said the nonprofit expects to pay 100 percent of the funds raised, with payouts beginning this week. As Al Etcheber, brother-in-law of Stacee Etcheber, one of the many innocent lives lost in the attack, says, “In no way can it replace someone’s life. … Still, it is a real nice way to help families who lost someone they loved.”In the wake of the attack during his performance in Las Vegas, Jason Aldean appeared on Saturday Night Live the subsequent weekend to offer his condolences and support to all those affected. He then performed an appropriate tribute: a rendition of the defiant anthem “I Won’t Back Down” by Tom Petty, who passed away the following day. Watch a clip of the tribute below:Jason Aldean – “I Won’t Back Down” (Tom Petty cover) – Tribute to Las Vegas Shooting Victims on SNL[Video: USA TODAY][H/T Billboard]last_img read more

HAA to open April 1 election

first_imgThis spring, alumni can vote for a new group of Harvard Overseers and elected directors for the Harvard Alumni Association (HAA) board.Ballots will be mailed no later than April 1 and must be received back in Cambridge by noon on May 18 to be counted. Results of the election will be announced at the HAA’s annual meeting on May 24, on the afternoon of Commencement day.  All holders of Harvard degrees, except Corporation members and officers of instruction and government, are entitled to vote for Overseer candidates. The election for HAA directors is open to all Harvard degree holders.Candidates for Overseer may also be nominated by petition, that is, by obtaining a prescribed number of signatures from eligible degree holders. The deadline for all petitions is Feb. 1.The HAA’s nominating committee has proposed the following candidates in 2012:For OverseerScott A. Abell ’72 Retired Chair & CEO, Abell & Associates Inc.BostonJames E. Johnson ’83, J.D. ’86 Partner, Debevoise & Plimpton LLPMontclair, N.J.Michael M. Lynton ’82, M.B.A. ’87 Chairman & CEO, Sony Pictures EntertainmentLos AngelesTracy P. Palandjian ’93, M.B.A. ’97 CEO & Co-Founder, Social Finance Inc.Belmont, Mass.Swati A. Piramal, M.P.H. ’92 Director, Piramal Healthcare Ltd.Mumbai, IndiaStephen R. Quazzo ’82, M.B.A. ’86 CEO & Co-Founder, Pearlmark Real Estate PartnersChicagoWilliam H. Rastetter, A.M. ’72, Ph.D. ’75 Partner, VenrockRancho Santa Fe, Calif.Kathryn A. Taylor ’80 Co-Chair, One PacificCoast Bank, Co-Chair, Board of DirectorsSan FranciscoFor Elected DirectorJohn F. Bowman ’80, M.B.A. ’85 Executive Producer, Disney CompanySanta Monica, Calif.Yvonne E. Campos, J.D. ’88 Superior Court Judge, State of CaliforniaSan Diego, Calif.John H. Jackson, Ed.M. ’98, Ed.D. ’01 President & CEO, Schott Foundation for Public EducationCambridge, Mass.Michael T. Kerr ’81, M.B.A. ’85 Portfolio Counselor & Senior Vice President, Capital Research CompanyCanyon Country, Calif.Sabrina Lam ’93Executive Director, TrinityHong KongSusanna Shore Le Boutillier ’86 Director, Corporate Communications, Colgate-Palmolive Co.Larchmont, N.Y.E. Scott Mead ’77 Fine Art Photographer and Financial AdviserLondonBrian Melendez ’86, J.D. ’90, M.T.S. ’91 Partner, Faegre Baker Daniels LLPMinneapolis, Minn.Loulan J. Pitre Jr. ’83, J.D. ’86 Attorney, Gordon, Arata, McCollam, Duplantis & Eagan LLCNew Orleanslast_img read more

New faculty: Teju Cole

first_img Math professor gives department a dose of algebraic combinatorics Related Professor sees ‘expansive opportunity’ in Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality GAZETTE: You mentioned Vijay, with whom you have been collaborating since 2013. Can you speak more about your partnership?COLE: I am grateful to be involved in various collaborations, but working with Vijay has been the most sustained and important. That the tide has brought us both here is astonishing. When we work together, what you have is two people who are trying to think of possibilities beyond their own field. Artists, facing an audience, want to call that audience to attention. How do we concentrate the focus of the people who sit before us in a concert or who buy our books? Vijay and I have independently been interested in doing that beyond our respective genres. To the person outside, he’s a jazz musician, but maybe he’s a performer of black American improvised music, or simply improvised music, and then it gets into this space of openness, where it is composed and free, partly predetermined, partly responsive to the present moment. And yet it all hangs together, it all has a necessity. That is a pretty close definition of what I try to do.GAZETTE: Do you have ideas on other possible collaborations at Harvard?COLE: A writer sits in his room and writes, but the idea of being a “professor of the practice” is exciting to me for what might happen. The University believes that a practitioner has a certain level of achievement to offer students, so I think part of the responsibility of the job is to keep finding ways to extend the work.It’s very easy for me to imagine some collaboration with Sarah Lewis [assistant professor of history of art and architecture and of African and African American studies], for instance. I contributed to her Vision & Justice issue of Aperture. And Arts and Humanities Dean Robin Kelsey is an expert on photography.I studied Northern Renaissance art and African art history, so it’s lovely that people like Joseph Koerner and Suzanne Blier are here. And of course there’s Visual and Environmental Studies, which might have well been my faculty home if I wasn’t in English. I look up to Chris Killip in VES the same way I look up to Helen Vendler in English. Lucien Castiang-Taylor in VES has been making amazing films that I’ve long admired.The heart of the matter, though, is the 12 students around the table in each of these two classes. I will select students across University, potentially from Harvard Medical School, the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard Divinity School, as well as undergraduates in the College. I’d like to have a nice mix. A professor ought to be a sympathetic intermediary between you and your potential audience: The audience is not necessarily sympathetic; it just wants good work. But your professor actually cares that this story means a lot to you, in addition to helping you make it good. I want to do for my students what my editors did for me: Show them how to maintain their writerly integrity without needlessly alienating their audience.GAZETTE: Was writing “Open City” this kind of experience for you?COLE: I think it was. In 1998, I dropped out of medical school. For a decade after that I couldn’t even say that I dropped out. It felt like such a heavy thing. I remember someone using those words, and how wounded I felt. But I went straight into studying art history in London and then I came back to Columbia to continue studying. I loved art and writing about art and why it was important, but I also felt the constraints of working in a purely academic way. I went to Nigeria in 2005, and shortly after I did “Every Day Is for the Thief” and then “Open City.” Both were written while I was supposed to be writing my dissertation. Procrastination in the extreme! I had no idea anyone would publish these works. I knew how intensely I was writing it, how intensely I was making my notes as I walked around the city [New York] hours at a time.You hear about people who hear God’s voice tell them to carve a church in the wilderness out of rock; that’s what writing “Open City” was for me: something spectral and strange, almost from beyond myself. And this voice, whatever it was, led me to a story narrated in the aftermath of 9/11 that was about the intensity of space and the historical dimensions of mourning in the space. An early reader said, “You clearly wrote the book you wanted to write,” and that was the warmest, sweetest thing I could hear.GAZETTE: You will be the first Gore Vidal Professor of the Practice of creative writing. Does that have meaning for you?COLE: It’s great! Usually the bequest is not from someone you’ve heard of. Vidal was a superb essayist, wonderful novelist, and a politically spirited and engaged American. In those general terms, he is a model of public intellectual engagement. I’m not a writer who is hidden away from the world. My work is political. Part of the role of the writer, I believe, is to take dangerous positions on behalf of those whose voices are not so easily heard. Gore Vidal did that. He also took positions one cannot agree with, but I’m grateful for the bequest, because it opens up the possibility of counter-positions. I dare say what he would want would be for this money to support an enterprise that is both enamored of literature, of whatever is fine in literary practice, and also bold, liberated, and liberatory.GAZETTE: So you will also be teaching boldness?COLE: Yes. For most students who end up here, Harvard can feel like the big prize. It’s dazzling. But here’s the thing: You have not arrived at a destination, you have arrived at a beginning. There’s so much to do that’s not about the grades. We live in a society in which there’s not only so much to do but also so much to undo. Students have a task ahead — not just of achievement, which can be mechanical, but also of deconstruction, which is often a more delicate matter. I want every student here to look around and see what’s not right and say, “It’s not right” — and it’s on them to commit to the undoing. Rather than “I won at life,” it’s “There’s so much to do and undo.” We are all being charged with real work, and all this thinking/language-work/writing is simply the ferry that gets us there.Interview was edited and condensed. Art historian maintains deep connections to landscapes of her youth New faculty: Robert Reid-Pharr Novelist, critic, and essayist Teju Cole will teach creative writing courses in the spring as the first Gore Vidal Professor of the Practice. The boundary-crossing author is known for his debut novel “Open City,” among other works. (Early admirers of the 2011 book included Harvard professor and New Yorker critic James Wood.) Cole received the PEN/Hemingway Award in 2011, the Windham Campbell Prize for Fiction in 2015, and a 2018 Guggenheim Fellowship. A photographer who has had solo exhibitions in the U.S. and Europe, he is also the photography critic for The New York Times Magazine.Q&ATeju ColeGAZETTE: Welcome to Harvard. What form will your teaching take here?COLE: Writing, language, and thinking are continuous for me, if not necessarily coterminous. In my published work, I try to break down the distinctions between them, and I do the same in my teaching. Writing is language-work, writing is thinking, and language-work is thinking. I’m going to teach two writing courses in the spring: “Writing Critically” and “Breaking Form.”The critical-writing course asks: How do we respond to the arts in writing? There’s a fair bit of art history in my background, and photo criticism is my métier, but I’ve also done some poetry, film, and music criticism, and I want to bring those experiences into the classroom. What does it mean to approach a work of art and say something illuminating and intelligent about it? This is technically a nonfiction writing workshop, but does criticism have to be nonfiction?John Berger tells the story about encountering an old man in a museum. The old man is looking at a painting, but the old man is Titian looking at his own painting. That’s critical writing, but that’s also fiction.That dissolving of genres will be even more explicit in my other class. “Breaking Form” will be a writing course about experimental modes of writing. We will ask: How do we take the received forms and break them down? How do we look at other writers? How come not anything goes? If the writing has to work, what makes it work?My friend Vijay Iyer [Franklin D. and Florence Rosenblatt Professor of the Arts] faces the same thing. He gets music students who have been given very rigid ideas of what jazz is and what the correct chord progressions should be. When you’re 18, or, really, at any age, you can mistake rigidity for rigor. As teachers, we trust that our students have the requisite rigor, but now we can help them be less rigid. That’s where it can start to get interesting! “When you’re 18, or, really, at any age, you can mistake rigidity for rigor. As teachers, we trust that our students have the requisite rigor, but now we can help them be less rigid. That’s where it can start to get interesting!” New faculty: Lauren Williams New faculty: Shawon Kinew New faculty: Ellis Monk Along with building on his own work, sociologist hopes to ‘nurture and inspire’ young researcherslast_img read more

Panama’s SENAN Makes Four Cocaine Busts in 7-day Span

first_imgOn March 13, SENAN officers arrested nine Colombians in connection with the seizure of 850 packages of cocaine, also in the provice of Colón. The cocaine was aboard the Colombian-flagged “Doña Omaira” vessel, according to SENAN Commissioner Ramón N. López. The Navy and the PCO-CTI did not immediately report whether security forces had captured any suspects in connection with the operation. By Dialogo March 25, 2015 Colombian National Navy seizes FARC weapons and cocaine And in the fourth seizure, on March 16, SENAN agents arrested four suspects and confiscated 250 kilograms of cocaine from a boat in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of the province of Chiriquí. The names of the suspects were not immediately identified. Colombia’s National Navy recently teamed with the Specialized Judicial Police Directorate against Organized Crime (PCO-CTI) to seize 1,337 kilograms of cocaine and an array of automatic weapons and ammunition believed to belong to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) in the Department of Chocó. Panama is a key transshipment point for international drug traffickers. About 90 percent of the cocaine that reaches the United States comes through Mexico and Central America, according to the United Nations International Narcotics Control Board. Military and law enforcement officials believe the contraband belonged to the FARC, which operates in the region and uses proceeds from drug trafficking to finance its terrorist operations. Panama is a key transshipment point for international drug traffickers. About 90 percent of the cocaine that reaches the United States comes through Mexico and Central America, according to the United Nations International Narcotics Control Board. Colombia’s National Navy recently teamed with the Specialized Judicial Police Directorate against Organized Crime (PCO-CTI) to seize 1,337 kilograms of cocaine and an array of automatic weapons and ammunition believed to belong to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) in the Department of Chocó. They found the cocaine, four rifles, a hand grenade and 210 ammunition cartridges during a search of a village along the Pacific Coast in a region near the country’s shared border with Panama. SENAN and the National Border Service (SENAFRONT) are branches of Panama’s Public Forces that have protected the country since the government abolished the military in 1990. On March 10, SENAN agents confiscated 262 packages of cocaine from the false bottom of a boat named “Rio” during Operation Santa Catalina de Bolonia in the Province of Panama. Later that day, in a separate operation in the province of Colón, law enforcement officers arrested a suspect who allegedly possessed 39 packets of cocaine. They found the cocaine, four rifles, a hand grenade and 210 ammunition cartridges during a search of a village along the Pacific Coast in a region near the country’s shared border with Panama. Panama’s National Aeronaval Service (SENAN) made four separate cocaine seizures during a seven-day period earlier this month. On March 10, SENAN agents confiscated 262 packages of cocaine from the false bottom of a boat named “Rio” during Operation Santa Catalina de Bolonia in the Province of Panama. Later that day, in a separate operation in the province of Colón, law enforcement officers arrested a suspect who allegedly possessed 39 packets of cocaine. SENAN and the National Border Service (SENAFRONT) are branches of Panama’s Public Forces that have protected the country since the government abolished the military in 1990. Military and law enforcement officials believe the contraband belonged to the FARC, which operates in the region and uses proceeds from drug trafficking to finance its terrorist operations. Colombian National Navy seizes FARC weapons and cocaine On March 13, SENAN officers arrested nine Colombians in connection with the seizure of 850 packages of cocaine, also in the provice of Colón. The cocaine was aboard the Colombian-flagged “Doña Omaira” vessel, according to SENAN Commissioner Ramón N. López. SENAN, which has seized 2,437 packets of cocaine since January, did not release the names of any of the suspects or the collect weight of the cocaine that agents seized in these three operations. SENAN, which has seized 2,437 packets of cocaine since January, did not release the names of any of the suspects or the collect weight of the cocaine that agents seized in these three operations. And in the fourth seizure, on March 16, SENAN agents arrested four suspects and confiscated 250 kilograms of cocaine from a boat in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of the province of Chiriquí. The names of the suspects were not immediately identified. The Navy and the PCO-CTI did not immediately report whether security forces had captured any suspects in connection with the operation. Panama’s National Aeronaval Service (SENAN) made four separate cocaine seizures during a seven-day period earlier this month. last_img read more