Industry’s First LNG Fueled Drillship Taking Shape

first_imgThe JDP will address challenges associated with storing and managing cryogenic LNG safely by combining DSME’s experience developing and applying LNG technology to floating structures with ABS’ technical standards and experience working on a number of gas-fueled, LNG and regasification unit projects.“This project builds on years of collaboration between ABS and DSME to evaluate innovative design concepts and new approaches that serve the needs of our clients and feature enhanced safety and efficiency standards,” says Dr. Hoseong Lee, ABS Vice President, Global Korea Business Development and ABS Korea Energy Technology Center in Busan. “We are targeting the Gulf of Mexico as a key market for an LNG fueled drillship where, given the abundance of affordable shale gas resources in the US, LNG as a marine fuel makes good economic sense.”To initiate the project, DSME has performed a concept design, comparison between two types of LNG storage tanks and analysis of the fuel gas supply system that will be installed on the drillship. ABS’ scope of work calls for concept design review, basic engineering review and a risk assessment of the tank space and access area, fuel gas supply system, machinery space and access area and associated configurations.The verification aspect of the JDP will rely on ABS’ extensive experience as the preferred classification society for the offshore and energy industry for more than 60 years and its experience leveraging these capabilities to help industry move LNG-as-fuel and other gas developments forward.“An LNG fueled drillship is another groundbreaking concept that illustrates how deepwater applications are evolving.””“Many North American vessel owners and operators are making the switch to LNG to achieve substantial operating savings by reducing fuel consumption and lowering emissions to meet the strict sulfur requirements in the North American Emissions Control Area,” says ABS Executive Vice President, Energy Development Ken Richardson. “ABS already has taken the critical first step to develop guidance that addresses the first application of LNG technology on US flagged support vessels for Gulf of Mexico operations. ABS has provided approval in principle (AIP) to numerous floating concepts designed to produce oil or natural gas as well as the largest LNG carriers currently in service and has evaluated a host of gas-related marine projects based on the application of prescriptive requirements and advanced risk analysis to verify compliance with accepted safety standards.Press Release, July 2, 2014, Image: DSME zoom One of DSME’s Drillship Designs (Deepwater Asgard)The American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) has entered into a joint development project (JDP) with South Korea’s Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME) to develop the industry’s first LNG fueled drillship.last_img read more

UN experts voice concern over increase in unsentenced detainees in Canada

The UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention, headed by Leila Zerrougui, highlighted concerns over both pre-sentencing detention in the criminal justice system, as well as the detention of asylum seekers and immigrants, at a press conference in Ottawa on the conclusion of a 15-day visit to the country at the Government’s invitation. The team stressed that such detention affected marginalized persons the most.“Detention on remand disparately impacts on vulnerable social groups, such as the poor, persons living with mental health problems, Aboriginal people and racial minorities,” the team said. In addition, they said, Canada’s vast geography often made access to legal counsel difficult for such people, even though the right to counsel is enshrined in law.In regard to the detention of immigrants, the team expressed concern over several aspects of detention under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA) that hampered the ability of immigrants to seek release from detention, including the lack of a requirement for counsel for their first review hearings. The UN Working Group’s visit, which was mandated by the Geneva-based UN Commission on Human Rights, included stops at 13 detention centres throughout Canada. In addition to talking to Government officials and representatives of non-governmental organizations (NGOs), the members interviewed approximately 150 detainees.The Group will present its final report on Canada to the Commission’s next session, which opens next March in Geneva. It has conducted previous fact-finding missions in countries as diverse as Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Iran, Mexico, Peru and the United Kingdom, it said, and last year visited China, Latvia and Belarus. read more

Seychelles UN expert urges technical vocational education to foster blue economy

Following his first visit to the country, the UN Special Rapporteur on the right to education, Kishore Singh, said that technical and vocational education and training, and collaboration with industry and enterprises “must be strengthened to ensure that the Seychellois acquire the skills and competencies needed to build the nation.”He noted a lack of dedicated, training teachers, a trend he called “very alarming” and said that the profession “is not attractive enough” for the quality education needed.“If the quality of education is to improve, measures must be taken to restore the esteem of the profession, as well as teaching conditions, to ensure the best students are attracted to teaching,” Mr. Singh said, warning that recent gains made in education are at risk if the crisis in teaching recruitment is not urgently addressed. During his eight-day visit to the Seychelles, which started on 14 October, Mr. Singh met with President James Michel and other senior Government officials, as well as representatives of civil society, teachers, and students.“The active participation of all sectors of civil society, including teachers, students, their parents and communities, is vital for a well-functioning national education system,” the UN independent expert said during visits to primary and secondary schools and public universities on the main island of Mahé.Independent experts or special rapporteurs are appointed by the Geneva-based UN Human Rights Council to examine and report back, in an unpaid capacity, on specific human rights themes. Mr. Singh will present his report to the Council in June 2014.Among the recommendations expected in his report will be continued support for the President’s National Renaissance Program.“This program provides a blueprint on how the serious social issues being faced by children at home and in schools can be addressed, but it can only succeed if parents and communities are actively engaged in dialogue and actions to find solutions together,” said Mr. Singh.“Strengthening personal, social and civil education in schools, and enhancing discipline in schools, are important means of addressing this challenge.” read more