Narragansett Beer reintroduces retro can design featured in Jaws in honour of

Narragansett Beer reintroduces retro can design featured in ‘Jaws’ in honour of ‘Shark Week’ PROVIDENCE, R.I. – Narragansett Beer is reintroducing a 1970s can design featured in the movie “Jaws.”The company says the retro design depicting a ship and a red diagonal stripe is being re-released temporarily in honour of the Discovery Channel’s “Shark Week,” which began Sunday.In the 1975 film, Capt. Sam Quint, the shark hunter played by the late Robert Shaw, crushes a can of ‘Gansett with one hand to intimidate the oceanographer played by Richard Dreyfuss.The Narragansett Brewing Co. was founded in Cranston, R.I., in 1888 and produced its first beer two years later. The company’s beers are now produced in Providence; Rochester, N.Y.; and Buzzards Bay, Mass. by The Associated Press Posted Aug 6, 2013 12:30 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more

Yellen promises clear communication of interest rate policies to minimize market disruptions

Yellen promises clear communication of interest rate policies to minimize market disruptions by Greg Keller And Martin Crutsinger, The Associated Press Posted Nov 7, 2014 8:17 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email PARIS – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Friday that the Fed is striving to clearly communicate its intentions on interest rates in order to minimize surprises that could disrupt financial markets both in the United States and globally.She said central bank policymakers understand that moving from a period of very low interest rates to more normal rates will lead to more volatility in financial markets.But she said the normalization of rates will be an important sign that economic conditions are “finally emerging from the shadow of the Great Recession.”Yellen’s comments came in a speech at a conference sponsored by the Bank of France. The Fed last week ended its bond-buying program but its first increase in rates is not expected until mid-2015.“As employment, economic activity and inflation rates return to normal, monetary policy will eventually need to normalize too, although the speed and timing of this normalization will likely differ across countries based on differences in the pace of recovery in domestic conditions,” Yellen said.“For our part, the Federal Reserve will strive to clearly and transparently communicate its monetary policy strategy in order to minimize the likelihood of surprises that could disrupt financial markets, both at home and around the world,” Yellen said.Yellen spoke after the Labor Department in Washington reported that the U.S. unemployment rate dropped in October to 5.8 per cent, the lowest point since July 2008, while the economy added a solid 214,000 jobs.During a question-and-answer session following her remarks, Yellen was not asked about Friday’s unemployment and she made no comments during her appearance about the current state of the U.S. economy or the possible timing of Fed interest rate moves.Yellen said that among the lessons learned from the crisis is that central banks need to be prepared to employ all available tools, including unconventional policies such as bond buying, to support economic growth and achieve optimal inflation rates.In response to a question, Yellen said that before the 2008 financial crisis hit, the Fed had spent a great deal of time studying the prolonged period of weak economic growth and deflation in Japan in an effort to learn how to deal with similar problems.She said among the lessons U.S. policy-makers drew from the Japanese experience was the need to quickly get banks on a sound footing and to guard against inflation persistently falling below the Fed’s 2 per cent target.“That was an important lesson from the Japanese experience that we have tried to learn from,” Yellen said.Last week, the Fed announced the end of its bond-buying program, which had been designed to keep long-term interest rates low, and upgraded its outlook for the U.S. labour market. The massive bond purchases have pushed the Fed’s balance sheet up by more than $3 trillion to nearly $4.5 trillion.In a statement after a two-day meeting, the Fed reiterated its plan to maintain its benchmark short-term interest rate near zero “for a considerable time.” The Fed statement noted that the job market is strengthening. The statement dropped a previous reference to “significant underutilization” of available workers.___Crutsinger reported from Washington. read more

Heres how the Ireland players rated against Sweden tonight

first_imgJonathan Walters: Despite often playing there for Stoke, he looked uncomfortable on the wing, but he still worked hard and contributed significantly to the defensive side of the game. 6James McClean: The one Irish player who demonstrated a constant willingness to take on players. He showed excellent energy down the wing and his discipline typified the Irish side’s maturity. 7 Robbie Keane: Another whose defensive contribution outweighed his effect in attack, despite looking sharp with the ball in the early stages of the game. 6Shane Long: Lead the attack manfully as ever, and did well to win the odd free-kick, though his influence on the game was minimal ultimately. 6Substitutes: None of the three players introduced had much time to make an impact, but Hoolahan looked especially bright in the short time he had on the field. 6Giovanni Trapattoni: Whatever your opinion of Trap is, there’s no denying his tactics proved effective tonight and the majority of his selections were justified. 7LIVE: Sweden v Ireland, World Cup qualifier>We can win in Dublin, insists Sweden boss Hamren> David Forde: Had one or two nervous moments early on, most notably when he came for a cross and missed it, but recovered well and made some decent saves to boot. 7Marc Wilson: Defended impressively and looked comfortable in possession for the most part, despite occasionally lumping it forward all too readily. 7Ciaran Clark: One dodgy clearance to set up Larsson aside, he gave a remarkably assured performance that belied his lack of experience at this level. 7 John O’Shea: Did what he had to do well – an excellent recovery from his error-laden performance against Germany. 7Seamus Coleman: Was lucky not to be punished after conceding possession to Ibrahimovic at one point, but apart from than one moment of uncertainty, his energy and commitment epitomised a gutsy Irish display. 7Paul Green: Gave the ball away cheaply at times, but made up for his occasional errors in possession by showing good positional sense and no shortage of effort without the ball. 7James McCarthy: Consistently showed intelligence and made good decisions on the ball, though his influence faded slightly as the game wore on. 7last_img read more