India: Two Kashmiri newspapers deprived of state ads in bid to apply pressure

first_img RSF demands release of detained Indian journalist Siddique Kappan, hospitalised with Covid-19 “Targeting two newspapers in this completely arbitrary manner clearly constitutes an act of crude intimidation,” said Daniel Bastard, the head of RSF’s Asia-Pacific desk. “The authorities have no right to harass the publications they dislike with the aim of imposing their own version of the facts. Amid a surge in tension in the Kashmir valley, it absolutely vital that newspapers should be able to cover the situation in a completely independent manner, especially as press freedom is an essential condition for defusing tension.” IndiaAsia – Pacific Media independenceProtecting sources Armed conflictsEconomic pressure A Kashmiri citizen reads a newspaper in Srinagar on 28 February, a day after Indian and Pakistani warplanes clashed. The free flow of independent information must be maintained if tension is to be defused in Kashmir (Photo: Tauseef Mustafa / AFP). The Jammu and Kashmir government took the decision two days after 46 Indian paramilitaries were killed in Pulwama, in western Kashmir, on 14 February by a suicide bomber who was a member of an Islamist militant group based across the border in Pakistan. News India: RSF denounces “systemic repression” of Manipur’s media Kashmir Reader owner and editor Haji Hayat Mohammad Bhat told RSF that the loss of advertising revenue would have “immense financial implications” for the two newspapers. “We would at the very least expect the government to tell us why they stopped the advertisements.” News “Immense financial implications” News The plight of Kashmir’s journalists is one of the many reasons why India is ranked no better than 138th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2018 World Press Freedom Index. Organisation Accredited Kashmiri reporters were arbitrarily prevented from covering an official event in Srinagar, the state capital, on 26 January to mark Republic Day of India, one of India’s three national holidays. Four journalists were injured when police deliberately fired shotgun pellets at reporters a week before that. Shujaat Bukhari, the editor of the leading regional newspaper Rising Kashmir, was gunned down in Srinagar in June 2018. April 27, 2021 Find out more The decision was clearly “intended to ensure that the free media are curbed,” Greater Kashmir publisher Rashid Makhdoomi told RSF. “All we have been told is that the stoppage orders have come from the top. We need to be told who at the top has stopped the advertisements.” There are many examples of how press freedom has been one of the leading collateral victims of the growing tension in the Kashmir Valley for the past two years. The journalist Aasif Sultan has been detained since 24 August because of an article he wrote for the Kashmir Narrator monthly, while the hearings in his case, including one on 15 February, keep on being postponed. Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns a decision by the authorities in Indian-held Kashmir to endanger the financial viability of the region’s two leading English-language newspapers by depriving them of all state advertising. The government must restore state ads and treat all Kashmiri publications equally, RSF said. March 5, 2019 India: Two Kashmiri newspapers deprived of state ads in bid to apply pressure In rural India, journalists face choice between covering pandemic and survival March 3, 2021 Find out more IndiaAsia – Pacific Media independenceProtecting sources Armed conflictsEconomic pressure The two newspapers, Greater Kashmir and Kashmir Reader, have been on life support for more than two weeks, ever since the Jammu and Kashmir state government began withholding all advertising from them on 16 February. No official explanation has been given for the decision although, as the Kashmiri private sector is very weak, the media depend almost totally on public sector ads. This latest decision by the Jammu and Kashmir government alluded to an October 2017 directive from the Union ministry of home affairs. The Hindustan Times, which has obtained a copy of the directive, said it named a number of Kashmiri media outlets, accused them of publishing content “glamourizing terrorists and anti-national elements” and recommended depriving them of state advertising. RSF_en News June 10, 2021 Find out more Collateral victim Follow the news on India Makhdoomi pointed out that the Directorate of Advertising and Visual Publicity, a federal government offshoot, previously cut off advertising in his newspaper in 2008 although it is the Kashmir Valley’s most widely read newspaper and its Facebook page alone now has more than 2 million followers. to go further Receive email alerts Help by sharing this information last_img read more

30-year-old man dies after attending ‘COVID party’ thinking virus was a ‘hoax’

first_imgMyriam Borzee/iStockBy ELLA TORRES, ABC NEWS(SAN ANTONIO, Texas) — “I think I made a mistake. I thought this was a hoax, but it’s not.”Those were the final words of a 30-year-old patient who died at a San Antonio, Texas, hospital this week after attending a so-called “COVID party,” according to the hospital’s chief medical officer.Dr. Jane Appleby said in a recorded statement that the unidentified patient told nurses about the party, which she said is hosted by someone diagnosed with coronavirus.“The thought is people get together to see if the virus is real and if anyone gets infected,” Appleby said.Appleby said she shared the story not to scare people, but to make sure they understand that the virus can affect anyone.Bexar County, where San Antonio is located, currently has 18, 602 confirmed cases, with an increase of 923 on Friday, according to the Department of Health.The age range with the most cases were in people aged 20 to 29, making up 24%, and 30 to 39, making up 20%, according to the department.Appleby said her hospital is seeing more cases in people in their 20s and 30s.She said while some can be treated and discharged, others become seriously ill.Appleby warned that the virus “doesn’t discriminate” and encouraged the public to wear a mask and stay home as much as possible.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Body talk

first_img Communication through body language has been going on for over a million years but has only been studied in the past 20 years. It is predicted, however, that its impact on communication will make it part of formal education. Here we interpret a few of the common signals and give practical advice on dealing with difficult situations• A person who rubs the back of their neck when lying usually avoids your gaze and looks down. This gesture is also used as a signal of frustration or anger and when this is the case the hand slaps the back of the neck first and then begins to rub the neck. If, for instance, you asked an employee to do a task and they had forgotten, when mentioned, they signal their forgetfulness by slapping their forehead or the back of the neck. If they slap their forehead they signal that they are not intimidated by you having mentioned their forgetfulness, but when they slap the back of their neck they non-verbally tell you that you are literally a pain in the neck for pointing out their error.• One of the most valuable gestures a negotiator can learn to recognise is seated readiness. Gestures that signal a desire to end a conversation or encounter are leaning forward with both hands on both knees or leaning forward with both hands gripping the chair. Should either of these occur during a conversation it could be wise to take the lead and terminate it. This allows you to maintain the psychological advantage and to keep the control.• This is a classic deceit cluster. As he rubs his eye he looks away towards the floor and both eyebrows are raised to the disbelief position. His head is turned away and down, showing a negative attitude. He also has an insincere, tight-lipped smile.• Inconsistency of gestures is plain here. The man is smiling confidently as he crosses the room, but one hand has crossed his body to play with his watch and form a partial arm barrier. This shows he is unsure of himself and/or his circumstances.• As an HR manager you are about to counsel an employee whose work performance has been unsatisfactory and erratic. To achieve this objective you will need to use direct questions that require direct answers and may put the employee under pressure. At times you will also need to show the employee you understand their feelings and even occasionally agree with their thoughts and actions. How can you convey these attitudes using body formations?Leaving aside interview and questioning techniques, consider the following scene. The counselling session is in your office and, as a manager, you can move from behind the desk to your employee’s side of the desk while maintaining unspoken control.There are three main angle formations that can be used:• The open triangle formation lends an informal relaxed attitude to the meeting and is a good position in which to open a counselling session. You can show non-verbal agreement with the employee from this position by copying his movements and gestures. Both torsos point to a third mutual point to form a triangle – this can show mutual agreement.• By turning your chair to point your body directly at the employee you are non verbally telling him that you want direct answers to your questions. Combine this position with the business gaze and reduced body and facial gestures and your subject will feel tremendous non-verbal pressure. If, for example, after you have asked them a question, they rub their eye and mouth and look away when they answer, swing your chair to point directly at them and say, “Are you sure about that?” This simple movement exerts non-verbal pressure on them and can force them to tell the truth.• When you position your body at a right angle away from your subject, you take the pressure off the interview. This is an excellent position from which to ask delicate or embarrassing questions, encouraging more open answers without applying pressure.ContactsPoses and annotations taken from Body Language: How to Read Other’s Thoughts by their Gestures, by Allan Pease. Sheldon Press. ISBN 0 8596 9653 7. Cost £7.99. Contact 020-7387 5282A Body Language Masterclass will take place at HRD Week on Tuesday 4 April 13.45-1500.HRD Week runs 3-6 April at Olympia Conference Centre. Tel: 020-8263 3434 Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Body talkOn 28 Mar 2000 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

Las Vegas Victims Fund To Distribute $31M+ To Survivors, Families Of Victims In Festival Shooting

first_imgOn the evening of October 1st, 2017, during Jason Aldean‘s closing set at Route 91 Harvest Festival in Las Vegas, a gunman opened fire on the crowd gathered on the Strip from the window of an overlooking casino hotel. He continued to fire for roughly an hour as the festival’s audience scrambled for cover. By the time authorities found him dead of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, he had murdered 58 people and injured more than 800 others, making it the most devastating mass shooting in modern American history.Ever since, people from all over banded together to support the countless people whose lives were lost or affected by the attack at the Route 91 Harvest Festival. What began as a GoFundMe campaign quickly ballooned into a full-blown nonprofit organization, The Las Vegas Victims Fund, and eventually pulled in more than $31M in donations.The fund reports receiving more than 90,000 individual donations, with nearly 40% coming from southern Nevada gambling, tourism, and entertainment companies. Students, faculty, and staff at a high school in suburban Henderson raised more than $66,000 through T-shirt sales and a #VegasStrong benefit concert that raised nearly $700,000.As the Associated Press reports, today the Las Vegas Victims Fund announced plans to pay $275,000 to the families of each of the 58 people killed in the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history. The fund also reported that the maximum $275,000 will also be paid to 10 other people who were paralyzed or suffered permanent brain damage in the shooting on the Las Vegas Strip. The fund posted a chart that projects the different donation amounts that will be issued to a total of 532 different people. The donations will be scaled individually based on the extent of the given victim’s medical expenses.Decisions regarding the disbursement of the funds were made by a committee of victim advocates, mental health and medical professionals, lawyers, donors and others, with input from two separate town hall meetings with the victims and their families.Las Vegas Victims Fund spokesman Howard Stutz said the nonprofit expects to pay 100 percent of the funds raised, with payouts beginning this week. As Al Etcheber, brother-in-law of Stacee Etcheber, one of the many innocent lives lost in the attack, says, “In no way can it replace someone’s life. … Still, it is a real nice way to help families who lost someone they loved.”In the wake of the attack during his performance in Las Vegas, Jason Aldean appeared on Saturday Night Live the subsequent weekend to offer his condolences and support to all those affected. He then performed an appropriate tribute: a rendition of the defiant anthem “I Won’t Back Down” by Tom Petty, who passed away the following day. Watch a clip of the tribute below:Jason Aldean – “I Won’t Back Down” (Tom Petty cover) – Tribute to Las Vegas Shooting Victims on SNL[Video: USA TODAY][H/T Billboard]last_img read more

City apartment comes with $500 of Kentucky Fried Chicken

first_img Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:36Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:36 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenFinger lickin’ sweetner 00:36 Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow much do I need to retire?00:58 Queensland’s most viewed home The self-confessed KFC fan said the demographic likely to be interested in the home were younger professionals and first homebuyers, a demographic he believed also had a taste for the kind of fine cuisine coated in 11 secret herbs and spices. “The feedback has been really positive so far,” Mr Bacon said. And while buyers may be lured in by almost a year of weekly hangover cures in the form of three-piece feeds, the apartment itself is a great buy, the local agent said. The 91sq m property is about two years old and has a private balcony with city views. More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus11 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market11 hours agoThe rooftop pool area is perfect for cooling off after one too many wicked wings. Picture: supplied.There is an open-plan, dining and kitchen area opening to the balcony, a master bedroom with ensuite and balcony access, a second bedroom with private outdoor space, a bathroom, a laundry and a study nook. Mr Bacon said the complex also has a rooftop pool, deck and massive barbecue area — the perfect place to unwind and enjoy a Zinger Burger while taking in the Brisbane city skyline.And if you have your fill of KFC, the property is close to bars, restaurants and cafes.Mr Bacon said with a last name like his, this campaign won’t be his last foodie incentive. “Bacon goes with everything,” he said. “I’ve got a few other tasty options coming up.” MORE NEWS: What NOT to do when it comes time to sellcenter_img Rare seaside estate hits the market Place Kangaroo Point agent Michael Bacon having a bit of a taste test.If you’ve been craving a city apartment with a side of Colonel Sander’s famous Kentucky Fried Chicken, this could be the deal too finger lickin’ good to pass up. Real estate agent Michael Bacon has listed a Kangaroo Point unit for sale with a $500 KFC voucher as a sweetener. The Place Kangaroo Point agent said with one of the Colonel’s stores across the road from 308/36 Anglesey St, it seemed like the logical marketing incentive. “I’ve done the math and $500 can get you around 550 chicken nuggets or 300 wicked wings or, with summer in mind, 500 $1 frozen drinks,” he said. The living spaces are big enough to invite some friends around for a Family Feast. Picture: suppliedlast_img read more

Pulis planning to revive Eagles

first_img “There are certain areas where you think that if the right player comes along you might want to improve in those areas but we have got six vital, vital games to get through before we start thinking about that.” Pulis, who spent his time reading about historical figures such as Winston Churchill and Napoleon Bonaparte after leaving Stoke at the end of last season, has yet to be relegated during his managerial career and took Stoke from the Championship into an FA Cup final and a subsequent Europa League campaign during his stay in Staffordshire. The home support inside Stoke’s Britannia Stadium is often heralded as among the best in the league and Pulis believes Palace fans can do their bit if he is to become the first manager to keep the Eagles in the Premier League for more than one season. “I just think the supporters of this football club have picked the baton up. I think it has been wonderful,” he added. “I think they appreciate what the club has done and where it has come from over the past couple of years. There is a rapport between the supporters and the team which is so, so important. “We need that. I kept saying when I was at Stoke how important that was and what a great part the supporters of Stoke City played in taking that club forward in the early years of the Premier League. “The Palace supporters have been exactly the same. You have to give them a performance to get behind. You have to give them something to shout about, but we certainly will need them. I have absolutely no doubt that they will stick with the team.” Norwich pose the first test to Pulis’ Palace side when they meet at Carrow Road on Saturday, but the former Gillingham and Bristol City boss will also be aware that a third win of the campaign would take his new team to within a point of the Canaries, who sit 16th in the table. New Crystal Palace manager Tony Pulis has refuted suggestions he is the long-ball merchant of the Barclays Premier League as he sets about keeping the Eagles in the division. Pulis will now look to continue the play-off winners’ mini revival and, despite having become renowned for a direct approach during his spell with the Potters, does not necessarily feel the hit-and-hope tag is a fair one. “I personally think we weren’t that (a long-ball team) at Stoke,” he said. “You have (Jermaine) Pennant, (Matthew) Etherington, Charlie Adam, good players like that – there are some top, top players at Stoke. We built it gradually. “Initially you start in a way you think will make you successful and build from there. The only thing I will say about that is for the seven years I was there we had that upward curve.” Palace found themselves bottom of the table when Holloway’s tenure came to an end despite bringing in as many as 16 new faces over the summer. However, Pulis has already been identifying areas he feels need work and could dip his toes in the transfer market when the January window opens – although for now he is focused solely on the Eagles’ forthcoming fixtures. “I have spoken to (co-chairman) Steve (Parish) about different things in different areas of the team and things that I think we need,” he said. “I haven’t come into this job without looking at the team and looking at games they have played before or monitoring things that have happened. The 55-year-old was unveiled as Ian Holloway’s replacement on Monday afternoon, signing a two-and-a-half-year deal and taking charge of a team who currently reside in the bottom three. Holloway left the Eagles following a heavy 4-1 home defeat to Fulham last month and, since his departure, caretaker boss Keith Millen has guided the Eagles to four points from four games – including just their second league win of the season at Hull on Saturday. Press Associationlast_img read more