FTSE 100 Santa Rally: Is it fact or fiction?

first_img Enter Your Email Address Looking for a stock that is for life and not just for Christmas…. Don’t miss our special stock presentation.It contains details of a UK-listed company our Motley Fool UK analysts are extremely enthusiastic about.They think it’s offering an incredible opportunity to grow your wealth over the long term – at its current price – regardless of what happens in the wider market.That’s why they’re referring to it as the FTSE’s ‘double agent’.Because they believe it’s working both with the market… And against it.To find out why we think you should add it to your portfolio today… There’s a ‘double agent’ hiding in the FTSE… we recommend you buy it! Image source: Getty Images FTSE 100 Santa Rally: Is it fact or fiction? Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. ‘Tis the season of goodwill. But, does the magic of the Christmas season extend all the way to the FTSE 100? The UK’s main stock market index is up 4.2% already, and we are not even halfway through December. That might cause investors to believe that the so-called Santa Claus Rally is more fact than fiction. However, the general cheer about coronavirus vaccines being rolled out in the UK and the pandemic looking to be coming to an end is probably a better explanation of why the FTSE 100 is performing strongly.Looking at the average monthly returns for the FTSE 100 in December, and the other 11 months, going all the way back to 1996 should provide a clearer picture. After looking at the data, there might be some truth around the idea of a Santa Rally lifting the FTSE 100 in December.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Has the FTSE 100 been naughty or nice?The Santa Claus Rally was identified in 1972, by a stock market analyst and author called Yale Hirsch. Specifically, it refers to a tendency of stock markets to rise in the last week or so in December. Market commentators have, however, extended the original observation to December as a whole. So, how does the FTSE 100 tend to perform in December? Well, the average monthly return on the FTSE 100 index in December is 2.02%. That is higher than any other month’s average return, save one, going all the way back to 1996. The average return in April was, in fact, the highest at 2.34%. However, my efforts to get the Easter Bunny Hop recognised have failed. That’s probably because Easter sometimes falls in March.Source: Yahoo Finance and author’s own calculationsSo let’s get back to the FTSE 100 and December. On average the market rises more in December than any month other than April. December also has the lowest standard deviation of returns at 2.98%, meaning they are less spread around the average compared to other months.That does not mean that losses do not occur in December. The worst December performance for the FTSE 100 was -5.49%.  In comparison, the worst returns in April and November were -3.25% and -4.6% respectively.What does this mean for investors?It’s an interesting observation that the FTSE 100 does tend to perform better in December compared to other months, except for April. The Santa Rally might indeed be real rather than fiction. Will this change how I invest? No, it won’t.Although there are numerous theories around why markets tend to do better in December, none of them has proved conclusive. Returns are not always positive in December, and there is no reliable way to predict if a Santa Rally will occur. I can’t tell which years will see the Easter Bunny Hop either, unfortunately.In an earlier article, I demonstrated that time in the market beats trying to time the market over the long-term. Trying to catch a Santa Rally or even an Easter Bunny Hop, is trying to time the market. Over 25 years or so I might get that average 2.02% or even 2.34% return. However, The FTSE 100 has returned 8.33% per year on average over the last 25 years, including dividend reinvestment. I would rather be in the market for the long term, rather than trying to time it. Click here to get access to our presentation, and learn how to get the name of this ‘double agent’! James J. McCombie | Tuesday, 8th December, 2020 See all posts by James J. McCombie James J. McCombie has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this.last_img read more

USS Bonhomme Richard Concludes Exercise Talisman Sabre

first_img View post tag: Naval USS Bonhomme Richard Concludes Exercise Talisman Sabre View post tag: Exercise Authorities July 20, 2015 View post tag: USS Bonhomme Richard Back to overview,Home naval-today USS Bonhomme Richard Concludes Exercise Talisman Sabre View post tag: Asia-Pacific View post tag: Navy After two weeks of dynamic maneuvering schemes and elevated command and control, USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), flagship to Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) 7 commanded by Rear Admiral Hugh D. Wetherald Commander, completed Exercise Talisman Sabre July 18.Bonhomme Richard, with USS Green Bay (LPD 20), USS Ashland (LSD 48), USS Preble (DDG 88), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), and counterparts from the Australian Defence Force (ADF) worked to make the biennial exercise a success.From the Northern Territory waters of the Indian Ocean to the North Australia Exercise Area, Bradshaw Field, Australia provided a unique setting for Australian and U.S. forces to increase the already-strong partnership between the two allies. It enabled the forces to accomplish missions across naval and land warfare.The Strike Group performed more than 20 landing craft, air cushion (LCAC) and landing craft utility (LCU) ship-to-shore connections and more than 40 MV-22 Osprey tiltrotor aircraft flights from the Bonhomme Richard. In those craft more than 2 million pounds of equipment was moved from the sea based platform to the Bradshaw Field Training Area.During Talisman Sabre the multifaceted training scenarios allowed the teams to practice integration.Ashore, Marines alongside members of the 2nd Battalion Royal Australian Regiment (2RAR) who embarked on USS Green Bay (LPD 20) participated in the amphibious assault, July 11 and in the field they conducted live-fire training.At sea, the Expeditionary Strike Group teamed up with Royal Australian Navy ships, HMAS Choules and HMAS Perth to conduct air, surface and sub-surface defense training allowing for a dynamic range of participant aircraft and ships.This was the sixth iteration of the Talisman Sabre exercise. Talisman Sabre merges the previous exercises Tandem Thrust and Crocodile into one biennial, combined exercise with U.S. and Australian forces. Planning teams have already begun preparations for Talisman Sabre 2017.Image: US Navy Share this article View post tag: TALISMAN SABRE View post tag: News by topiclast_img read more

​One third of European insurers expect to cut number of external asset managers

first_img“Driven by a need to streamline oversight and find new ways of generating yield, insurers in Europe are consolidating their outsourced investment assets and leveraging the expertise of asset managers to a greater extent than ever before,” Cerulli Associates said.While 29.1% of European insurers in the study said they expected to cut their external asset manager counts, 16.4% expected no change and 49.1% were unsure.Cerulli said that larger insurers were better able to cope with the complex oversight associated with outsourcing to a larger number of asset managers.Justina Deveikyte, associate director of European institutional research at Cerulli, said: “Although partnership-type engagement has been triggered by regulatory and economic pressures, the approach is most likely here to stay.”
Partnerships differed from traditional mandates in that insurers demanded a range of services, from governance and risk management to operations and bespoke product research, she said.
“Simpler oversight and greater investment returns are the two key goals of strategic partnerships,” she added. “We expect to see continued demand for riskier fixed-income and illiquid assets.” Almost a third of European insurance companies expect to reduce the number of third-party asset managers they work with over the next 12 to 24 months, according to new research.This was more than five times the 5.5% of respondents anticipating an increase, as insurers preferred “strategic partnerships” instead, data analysis firm Cerulli Associates reported.Only large insurers – those with more than €100bn in assets – foresaw a rise in their external asset manager tallies, the US-based company found.The firm said its 2019 insurance research found that European insurance companies were seeking strategic partnerships with asset managers, with expertise being sought in particular to address increased oversight related to Solvency II and poor returns linked to low-yield assets in Europe, especially government bonds.last_img read more

The science of finding dead bodies: Techniques to be revealed at fascinating talk

first_imgDonegal County Museum is set to host a talk on how geoforensics can assist in the investigation of murders and suspicious death.Geoforensics, including geography, geology, and hydrology and soil science, is a method forensic scientists use to help solve crimes.The fascinating talk will be held on Saturday, October 12th at 2pm with forensic geologist, Dr Alastair Ruffell. The talk will be based entirely upon real Irish cases from the bizarre to the shocking.Dr Alastair RuffellDr Ruffell is based in the School of Geography, Archaeology and Paleoecology at Queen’s University, Belfast.He works on Geoforensics, searching for toxic waste, human bodies or buried weapons, and geological aspects of climate change.He has been involved in over 170 cases of serious crime and humanitarian searches. This talk is admission free and has limited places with no admittance without prior booking.Bookings required to Donegal County Museum, High Road, Letterkenny, Co Donegal.Please note this talk is not suitable for all as it will show some graphic images from real cases and is strictly for those ages 18 +.You can find out more information by ringing 074 9124613 or emailing [email protected]  The science of finding dead bodies: Techniques to be revealed at fascinating talk was last modified: October 6th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Photo library: Countryside 17

first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download Countryside contact sheet (1.6MB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) Western Cape province:The sun sets over a railway line near Swellendam.Photo: Rodger Bosch,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Free State province: A field of sunflowers stands out against the landscape of the Eastern Free State. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Free State province: A field of sunflowers stands out against the landscape of the Eastern Free State. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Free State province:Sunflower fields in the Western Free State. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Free State province: Sunflower fields in the Western Free State. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Free State province: Sunflower fields in the Western Free State. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Free State province: Sunflower fields in the Western Free State. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Free State province: Sunflower fields in the Western Free State. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Free State province: Sunflower fields in the Western Free State. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image COUNTRYSIDE 17: {loadposition cs}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about the image library? Email Janine Erasmus at [email protected]last_img read more