Charities considered an accurate & unbiased source of information, nfpSynergy trust research shows

first_img New research – what exactly are charities trusted to do? from nfpSynergy Tagged with: Research / statistics trust Melanie May | 6 July 2017 | News Charities are trusted by the public to give unbiased and accurate information, as well as to provide commentary on UK policy, nfpSynergy’s latest research has revealed.Charities come second in a list of ten sources according to nfpSynergy, after family and friends, and just before the BBC, TV news channels and news websites, with 65% of the public trusting them a great deal or quite a lot as an accurate source of information. Charities are also seen as an ‘unbiased and impartial’ source of trusted information, again coming second after family and friends and before the BBC, TV news channels, and news websites, with 53% of the public trusting them a great deal or quite a lot.When asked who were trusted sources of commentary on UK policy, the research shows people who run charities are in the top five after healthcare professionals, scientists, and academics and just above economists. British politicians were fourth from bottom. Charities were trusted a great deal or quite a lot by 42% of the public, compared to 19% for politicians. This has increased from 31% in 2016, while during the same period big business has dropped from 26% to 21% as a trusted source of policy commentary.  484 total views,  4 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis10 Research into the public’s trust in charities in a number of other areas indicates that charities are also trusted to make a positive impact on UK society with 64% of those questioned trusting them quite a lot or a great deal, and to fundraise appropriately (61%), with lesser levels of trust in areas including spending donations wisely (57%) and using the personal data of their supporters responsibly (53%).This is the first report in a new strand of research for nfpSynergy, which has been introduced to try and understand what charities are trusted to do and how they are trusted compared to other sectors in areas such as policy. It was carried out online with 1,000 members of the public representative by age gender and social class. The majority of this research was carried out in February of this year, with the public’s trust levels in charities in these other areas dating back to October 2016.  483 total views,  3 views today Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis10 Charities considered an accurate & unbiased source of information, nfpSynergy trust research shows About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

South Sudan: Juba Monitor founder Alfred Taban held by security services

first_img August 21, 2020 Find out more July 18, 2016 – Updated on September 27, 2016 South Sudan: Juba Monitor founder Alfred Taban held by security services August 25, 2020 Find out more Organisation Follow the news on South Sudan Receive email alerts News South SudanAfrica ImpunityImprisoned RSF welcomes UN Special Rapporteur’s statement calling for justice for Christopher Allen three years on Red alert for green journalism – 10 environmental reporters killed in five years RSF_en South SudanAfrica ImpunityImprisoned Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls for the immediate release of Alfred Taban, a well-known journalist who has been detained by South Sudan’s security services for the past two days. Help by sharing this information to go further News December 23, 2020 Find out more Taban and Ana Namiriano, the editor of the Juba Monitor newspaper, were summoned to the headquarters of the security services in Juba on 16 July. Namiriano was allowed to leave after questioning but Taban (who founded the Juba Monitor in 2000, when it was called the Khartoum Monitor) was detained without any formal charge being brought against him. His state of health is worrying and it is not known where he is being held. “We urge the South Sudanese authorities to free Alfred Taban without delay and to ensure that his rights are respected and that he has access to a doctor,” RSF said. “This leading journalist’s arrest constitutes yet another violation of media freedom in a country that has endured extensive violations of civil liberties since the start of the civil war.” Several sources said the arrest of Taban, who also heads the Association for the Development of Media in South Soudan (ADMISS), was a reprisal for his 15 July “Let us speak out” column where he criticised President Salva Kiir and Vice-president Riek Machar, for their role in the violent crisis that started on 7 July 2016 and has resulted in at least 300 dead. Since the start of this latest violence, in which hundreds of people have been killed and thousands displaced, officials have intensified repressive measures and the security services have imposed curbs on free movement. They had already been targeting journalists and human rights defenders in particular since the start of the year and many journalists are now in hiding. John Gatluak Manguet Nhial, a respected journalist who coordinated and reported for Radio Naath FM in Leer, was killed with complete impunity in Juba’s Terrain Hotel on 11 July, probably because he is a member of the Nuer ethnic group. South Sudan is ranked 140th out of 180 countries inRSF’s 2016 World Press Freedom Index, having fallen 26 places since the start of the conflict. News News Online memorial and writing prize launched to mark 30th birthday of slain journalist Christopher Allenlast_img read more

VTrans announces $2 million supplemental paving program

first_imgGovernor Peter Shumlin today announced that the Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTrans) will pave an additional 23 miles of state highway than was originally planned to occur.  ‘Vermonters know our roads are in really tough shape this year and I’m pleased to announce that VTrans has made adjustments in order to fund additional paving this construction season’ Governor Shumlin said. ‘State highways have incurred serious damage from the heavy snow falls of this past winter followed by record-breaking spring rain. The additional investment into paving to the areas of greatest need will help improve road surfaces across the State,’ he said. VTrans is taking advantage of a provision passed by the Legislature that authorizes the transfer of up to $2 million to paving for the specific purpose of addressing the condition of state highways that incurred damage from the severe winter.  The additional funding will be used by the Agency’s nine Maintenance Districts to ‘level’ 23 additional miles of roadway this summer and fall.  The supplemental funding increases the total planned ‘leveling’ from $4 million to $6 million, and from 38 miles to 61 miles.  Unlike the Agency’s main paving program, which provides long-term road surface treatments, leveling is designed to provide a thin layer of surface treatment with an expected lifespan of three-to-five years. ‘VTrans identified for leveling 61 miles of roadway in 25 different towns spread all over the state,’ Transportation Secretary Brian Searles said. ‘The projects range in size from as long as 6.9 miles of Route 108 in Berkshire to as short as six-tenths of a mile of Route 2 in South Burlington.’  During fiscal year 2012, VTrans anticipates improving over 100 miles of interstate highways, approximately 160 miles of state highways, and numerous grants to towns for improvements to town highways.last_img read more

Matt Shoemaker satisfied that he feels good three starts into return to Angels

first_imgPreviousANAHEIM, CA – SEPTEMBER 14: Shohei Ohtani #17 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim runs the bases during batting practice before playing the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium on September 14, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by John McCoy/Getty Images)The Mariners’ Robinson Cano slides home safely on an RBI single by Ryon Healy as Angels catcher Jose Briceno looks on during the fourth inning of Friday’s game at Angel Stadium. (Photo by John McCoy/Getty Images)Los Angeles Angels shortstop Andrelton Simmons, left, gets set to tag out Seattle Mariners’ Jean Segura as he tires to steal second during the fifth inning of a baseball game Friday, Sept. 14, 2018, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsANAHEIM, CA – SEPTEMBER 14: Andrelton Simmons #2 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim tags Jean Segura #2 of the Seattle Mariners out trying to steal second base in the fifth inning at Angel Stadium on September 14, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by John McCoy/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – SEPTEMBER 14: Matt Shoemaker #52 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim pitches to the Seattle Mariners in the first inning at Angel Stadium on September 14, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by John McCoy/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – SEPTEMBER 14: Roenis Elias #55 of the Seattle Mariners pitches to the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim in the first inning at Angel Stadium on September 14, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by John McCoy/Getty Images)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani, right, of Japan, follows through as he hits a foul ball as Seattle Mariners catcher Mike Zunino watches during the second inning of a baseball game Friday, Sept. 14, 2018, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Seattle Mariners’ Robinson Cano, right, scores on an RBI-single by Ryon Healy as Los Angeles Angels catcher Jose Briceno stands at the plate during the fourth inning of a baseball game Friday, Sept. 14, 2018, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Seattle Mariners’ Robinson Cano, left, gestures after scoring on an RBI-single by Ryon Healy as Los Angeles Angels catcher Jose Briceno stands at the plate during the fourth inning of a baseball game Friday, Sept. 14, 2018, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)ANAHEIM, CA – SEPTEMBER 14: Robinson Cano #22 of the Seattle Mariners celebrates after scoring on a RBI single by Ryon Healy in the fourth inning at Angel Stadium on September 14, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by John McCoy/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – SEPTEMBER 14: Matt Shoemaker #52 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim pitches to the Seattle Mariners in the first inning at Angel Stadium on September 14, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by John McCoy/Getty Images)Los Angeles Angels shortstop Andrelton Simmons fields a ball hit by Seattle Mariners’ Robinson Cano before throwing him out at first during the first inning of a baseball game Friday, Sept. 14, 2018, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)ANAHEIM, CA – SEPTEMBER 14: Shohei Ohtani #17 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim flips his bat after hitting the ball foul in the eihth inning at Angel Stadium on September 14, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by John McCoy/Getty Images)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani, of Japan, takes his helmet off after swinging for a strike during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Seattle Mariners Friday, Sept. 14, 2018, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Seattle Mariners’ Kyle Seager, right, scores on a single by Dee Gordon as Los Angeles Angels catcher Jose Briceno stands at the plate during the seventh inning of a baseball game Friday, Sept. 14, 2018, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)ANAHEIM, CA – SEPTEMBER 14: Shohei Ohtani #17 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim reacts to fouling the ball off of his foot against the Seattle Mariners in the eighth inning at Angel Stadium on September 14, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by John McCoy/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – SEPTEMBER 14: Manager Mike Scioscia of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim walks out to batting practice before playing the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium on September 14, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by John McCoy/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – SEPTEMBER 14: Shohei Ohtani #17 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim runs the bases during batting practice before playing the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium on September 14, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by John McCoy/Getty Images)The Mariners’ Robinson Cano slides home safely on an RBI single by Ryon Healy as Angels catcher Jose Briceno looks on during the fourth inning of Friday’s game at Angel Stadium. (Photo by John McCoy/Getty Images)NextShow Caption1 of 17The Mariners’ Robinson Cano slides home safely on an RBI single by Ryon Healy as Angels catcher Jose Briceno looks on during the fourth inning of Friday’s game at Angel Stadium. (Photo by John McCoy/Getty Images)ExpandANAHEIM — For Matt Shoemaker, the final month of this lost Angels season is about proving he’s healthy and can be effective.He seems to be the former, and the jury is still out on the latter.Shoemaker started with three perfect innings but then couldn’t get out of the fifth inning in the Angels’ 5-0 loss to the Seattle Mariners on Friday night.It was essentially a continuation of his first two starts of the month, one in which he pitched five scoreless innings and one in which he gave up three runs in five innings. Jose Suarez’s rocky start sinks Angels in loss to Astros Angels’ Mike Trout working on his defense, thanks to Twitter One splitter got him into trouble, though.After he’d allowed a run on three straight hits to start the fourth, he was an out away from escaping with no further damage. He threw a 2-and-2 splitter to Ryon Healy, but he hung it. Healy roped it into left field for a two-run single.“The problem is in the fourth inning I still executed a lot of pitches, just that one pitch to Healy,” Shoemaker said. “If that’s an out, I gave up one run. That’s not a big deal at all. I gave up two runs with two outs. That’s tough to swallow.”Shoemaker gave up a double in the fifth, and he would have escaped that inning too, but third baseman Taylor Ward booted a ground ball with two outs. That ended Shoemaker’s night after 77 pitches.At that time the Angels still had only one hit. Their best chance at a run was Mike Trout’s deep drive in the fourth, which center fielder Dee Gordon caught with a leap at the fence. They finished with six hits.“They got some key hits with guys in scoring position and we didn’t get ours,” Scioscia said. “That tilted the game in their favor.” Angels offense breaks out to split doubleheader with Astros Shoemaker has said he thinks he’ll be fine now, and these three starts have been positive steps.“Overall, I’m pleased,” he said. “I’m encouraged. I feel good going out there. I just wanted to go out and compete. That’s the most fun. That’s why we play. Overall I feel really good. I just wanted to keep building off it.”With Shoemaker apparently healthy, the next step is for him to be effective.Throughout his Angels career, he’s been to both extremes. At times, like his rookie year in 2014, he’s pitched like a top of the rotation pitcher. Other times, he’s looked like a fringe starter.That’s all been wrapped up in his three starts this month, including a strange outing on Friday. After retiring the first nine hitters, he gave up three runs in the fourth.He was pounding the strike zone early, and his splitter was good throughout the game. The Mariners swung and missed at nine of Shoemaker’s 26 splitters, a rate of 34.6 percent. Normally, he’s around 20 percent.Related Articlescenter_img Angels’ poor pitching spoils an Albert Pujols milestone Most important, three games in he has reported no issues with the forearm trouble that cost him most of the past two seasons. He was visited on the mound by trainer Eric Munson in the fifth inning on Friday, but Munson allowed him to continue pitching after a quick chat.Shoemaker said he was just a little fatigued, having just thrown 25 pitches in the previous inning.Sign up for Home Turf and get exclusive stories every SoCal sports fan must read, sent daily. Subscribe here.“I haven’t had a long inning like that in a long time, so I was a little tired going out for the fifth,” Shoemaker said. “After the first hitter, it wore off. The adrenaline kicked in and I got back into rhythm.”Manager Mike Scioscia said it was a relief that Shoemaker still seems to be physically fine. When Shoemaker had previous issues with his forearm, the trouble cropped up around the 50- to 60-pitch range, and Shoemaker has now gotten through that all three times.One of the reasons that Shoemaker’s injury troubles persisted, he believes, is that the injury wasn’t correctly diagnosed in 2017. He had surgery to release the radial nerve. It wasn’t until they opened him up again this year, in May, that doctors saw he had a split pronator tendon, which they repaired. Angels’ Shohei Ohtani spending downtime working in outfield Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more