Broadway Salutes’ 2016 Honorees Make the Great White Way Sparkle & Shine

first_imgNina Lannan, Charlotte St. Martin, Julie Menin, Daisy Eagan, Alex Brightman, Rashidra Scott, Leslie Kritzer, Laura Penn & Anthony DePaulo(Photo: Emilio Madrid-Kuser) Every year, the go-getters who have dedicated their time and creativity to making the Great White Way the best it can be for 25, 35 or even 50-plus years are toasted at Broadway Salutes. The eighth annual celebration took place on September 20 in Shubert Alley. Broadway.com was on the scene to grab a shot of past Broadway League Chair and Event Co-Chair Nina Lannan, Broadway League President Charlotte St. Martin, NYC Mayor’s Office Commissioner of Media and Entertainment Julie Menin, Tony winner Daisy Eagan, School of Rock frontman and Tony nominee Alex Brightman, Broadway alum Rashidra Scott, Something Rotten!’s Leslie Kritzer, Stage Directors & Choreographers’ Society Executive Director and Event Co-Chair Laura Penn and Anthony DePaulo, International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees’ Vice President, Coalition of Broadway Unions & Guilds’ Chair and Event Co-Chair. Brightman hosted the event, which included performances from Kritzer, Scott and Eagan. Additional honorees included Guy M. Caso, Catherine Jayne and Tatiana Koulombis and Scott Mallalieu. Broadway director Marc Bruni (pictured below) helmed the successful program. Here’s to all those who put the razzle dazzle in the Great White Way! View Commentslast_img read more

Kudzu bug control

first_imgUniversity of Georgia researcher John Ruberson is looking for natural enemies of the kudzu bug in an effort to fight the pest’s spread across the Southern states. A tiny Asian wasp may be the best option. The kudzu bug was first spotted in Georgia in the fall of 2009. It feeds on kudzu, soybeans and other legumes and has become a nuisance to homeowners and a threat to international trade as an agricultural contaminant.A test runThis summer in collaboration with colleagues Walker Jones, of the USDA-Agricultural Research Service in Stoneville, Miss. and Jeremy Greene of Clemson University Ruberson plans to test the effectiveness of an egg parasitoid as a kudzu bug control method. A parasitoid is an organism that spends the immature portion of its life attached to or within a single host organism causing the host to die. Ruberson’s parasitoid of choice is Paratelenomus saccharalis, a tiny wasp no larger than the period at the end of this sentence. The wasp lays its ow egg in each kudzu bug egg, and the developing wasp larva destroys the kudzu bug egg as it develops. And, the wasp doesn’t sting humans.“Using classical biological control is an option in the tool kit,” said Ruberson, an entomologist in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “There are several known parasitoids, one pathogen from India and one predator from Pakistan that are all natural enemies of the kudzu bug.”UGA scientists “know very little” about the predator and the pathogen, Ruberson said. They are working closely with Keiji Takasu of Kyushu University in Fukuoka, Japan who has extensive knowledge of the wasp.It has to be safe for the ecosystem“We have to demonstrate the safety of the organism before it can be released,” he said. “We want to make sure it’s a safe release so it doesn’t mess up the ecosystem.” Ruberson and his colleagues are applying for a USDA permit for parasitoid release and will follow the required steps to ensure the wasp isn’t a danger to native insects and pests.UGA researchers are still searching for natural kudzu bug enemies that are native to Georgia and the Southeast. “We haven’t found any egg parasites in the past two years in Georgia on kudzu or soybean,” Ruberson said. “We have found some chewed kudzu bug eggs that have been damaged by something. We just don’t know by what yet.”Kudzu bug buffetJones and Ruberson set up makeshift kudzu bug buffets in their laboratories to find out whether or not native egg parasites and predators like to dine on the new pest. Native egg parasites “show no interest” in the eggs, Ruberson said. He offered common predators a meal of 10 kudzu bug nymphs and observed their dining habits. Two predator species (big-eyed bugs) ate all the nymphs and the rest ate 20 to 30 percent of the nymphs.“Lady beetle larvae ate quite a few, but the adults weren’t interested,” Ruberson said. “We do have some native predators that like to eat the nymphs, but we need to find out what they will do in the field. These species are all generalists. They may move back and forth between types of insects and not provide consistent control.”last_img read more

Governor Douglas proclaims fire prevention week in Vermont

first_img### Governor Jim Douglas today signed a proclamation declaring Fire Prevention Week in Vermont at an event with students at St. Johnsbury Elementary School. The 2010 Fire Prevention Week theme is, ‘Smoke Alarms: A sound you can live with!’Fires result in an average of nine deaths in Vermont each year, cause more than a 1,000 people to be treated at emergency departments for fire and burn injuries and cost an estimated $70 million in property damage. Working smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms, installed outside of each sleeping area and on every level of every home, are essential for the safety of Vermonters.‘Vermonters are fortunate to have highly trained professionals educating the public about fire prevention and safety and willing to risk their lives when disaster strikes,’ said Governor Douglas. ‘Fire Prevention Week is an opportunity to remind all Vermonters of the simple actions we can take to stay safe, such as installing and maintaining smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms in our homes.’The Professional Fire Fighters of Vermont (PFFV) have distributed Fire Safety Educational Activity Books to over 200 elementary schools across Vermont over the past eight years. This year marks the distribution of their 100,000th Fire Safety Educational Activity Book given to elementary school children, assisting in the safety of children across Vermont.Matt Vinci, PFFV President said, ‘The Professional Fire Fighters of Vermont proudly support Fire Prevention Week by distributing over 14,000 Fire Safety Activity Books annually to elementary schools across the state, making Vermont a safer place to live, work and visit.’Source: 10.7.2010last_img read more

Tyson recalls frozen ready-to-eat chicken products due to contamination

first_imgWashington D.C. — Tyson Foods, Inc., a Rogers, Ark. establishment, is recalling approximately 69,093 pounds of frozen, ready-to-eat chicken strip products that may be contaminated with extraneous materials, specifically pieces of metal, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.The frozen, ready-to-eat chicken strip items were produced on November 30, 2018. The following products are subject to recall: [View Labels (PDF only)]25-oz. plastic bag packages of frozen “Tyson FULLY COOKED BUFFALO STYLE CHICKEN STRIPS CHICKEN BREAST STRIP FRITTERS WITH RIB MEAT AND BUFFALO STYLE SAUCE” with “BEST IF USED BY NOV 30 2019,” case codes 3348CNQ0317 and 3348CNQ0318, and individual bag time stamps from 17:00 through 18:59 hours (inclusive).25-oz. plastic bag packages of frozen “Tyson FULLY COOKED CRISPY CHICKEN STRIPS CHICKEN BREAST STRIP FRITTERS WITH RIB MEAT” with “BEST IF USED BY NOV 30 2019,” case codes 3348CNQ0419, 3348CNQ0420, 3348CNQ0421, and 3348CNQ0422, and individual bag time stamps from 19:00 through 22:59 hours (inclusive).20-lb. cases of frozen “SPARE TIME FULLY COOKED, BUFFALO STYLE CHICKEN STRIPS CHICKEN BREAST STRIP FRITTERS WITH RIB MEAT AND BUFFALO STYLE SAUCE” with “BEST IF USED BY NOV 30 2019,” and case code 3348CNQ03.The products subject to recall bear establishment number “P-7221” on the back of the product package. For product clarification, the last two digits of the product case codes correspond to the hour produced and will match the first two numbers of the time stamp (as depicted on the label). These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide and for institutional use in locations in Michigan and Washington.The problem was discovered when FSIS received two consumer complaints of extraneous material in the chicken strip products.There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers’ freezers. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Tyson Foods Consumer Relations at 1-866-886-8456. Members of the media with questions about the recall can contact Gary Mickelson, Senior Director of Public Relations, Tyson Foods, Inc., at (479) 290-6111.last_img read more

Angels fans make an all-too-familiar tribute to Tyler Skaggs

first_imgPreviousAngel fans, front to back, Reza Agahi, Grant Gaynor, both of Anaheim and William St.Marseille of Orange leave flowers at amemorial outside Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Monday, July 1, 2019 in memory of Angel pitcher Tyler Skaggs who died in Texas at the age of 27. (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)Mourners gather around aa memorial for Angel pitcher Tyler Skaggs outside Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Monday, July 1, 2019. Skaggs died in Texas at the age of 27. (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)An emotional Amanda Wojciechowski, right, and her son Mason, 4, drove from Long Beach to visit a memorial for Angel pitcher Tyler Skaggs outside Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Monday, July 1, 2019. Tyler Skaggs died in Texas at the age of 27 (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsBob Horan of Anaheim leaves flowers at a memorial outside Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Monday, July 1, 2019 in memory of Angel pitcher Tyler Skaggs who died in Texas at the age of 27 (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)An electronic sign at the entrance to Angel Stadium has Tyler Skaggs birth and death year in Anaheim on Monday, July 1, 2019. Angel pitcher Tyler Skaggs died in Texas at the age of 27. (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)Bob Horan of Anaheim pauses at a memorial outside Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Monday, July 1, 2019 in memory of Angel pitcher Tyler Skaggs who died in Texas at the age of 27. “I’m shocked and stunned,” said Horan. (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)Nancy Dodson of Garden Grove pauses to say a pray at a memorial outside Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Monday, July 1, 2019 in memory of Angel pitcher Tyler Skaggs who died in Texas at the age of 27. Dodson was on the way to Angel Stadium to pick up free tickets when she heard on the news that Tyler had died. (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)An impromptu memorial is set up on the pitchers mound outside Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Monday, July 1, 2019 in memory of Angel pitcher Tyler Skaggs who died in Texas at the age of 27. (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)Angel fans, front to back, Reza Agahi, Grant Gaynor, both of Anaheim and William St.Marseille of Orange leave flowers at amemorial outside Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Monday, July 1, 2019 in memory of Angel pitcher Tyler Skaggs who died in Texas at the age of 27. (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)Mourners gather around aa memorial for Angel pitcher Tyler Skaggs outside Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Monday, July 1, 2019. Skaggs died in Texas at the age of 27. (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)NextShow Caption1 of 8Mourners gather around aa memorial for Angel pitcher Tyler Skaggs outside Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Monday, July 1, 2019. Skaggs died in Texas at the age of 27. (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)ExpandBob Horan of Anaheim took a knee and stared at the message board that read: Tyler Skaggs, 1991-2019. He brought a bouquet.“I’m shocked and stunned at another tragedy that has befallen the Angels,” said Horan, an Angels fan since 1961 and a season ticket holder. “It seems like this happens a lot to this organization. The only thing I could do was come down here with the flowers.”Skaggs. Adenhart. Lyman Bostock. Donnie Moore. Mike Miley. The list of Angels and former Angels who died tragically is too long.“Again, tragedy with the Angels,” said Ernie Morales of Orange. “Why so young? He (Skaggs) was just coming into his own.”Grant Gaynor of Anaheim said he met Skaggs during spring training. The Angels pitcher took the time to talk with him and gave him an autographed baseball. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Some of them approached in tears. Some knelt. Some closed their eyes and spoke softly in prayer.They brought red carnations and roses, rally monkeys and baseball caps. Many wrote solemn messages that ended with #45, a tribute to Tyler Skaggs, the 27-year-old  Angels pitcher who was found dead Monday afternoon at the team’s hotel in Texas.Angels fans felt compelled to come to the Big A  upon hearing about Skaggs’ death. Many of them talked about how sad it was to see the makeshift memorial in the same spot – the bricked mound in the stadium’s plaza – where they had left flowers for Nick Adenhart, the Angels pitcher killed by a drunk driver in 2009.“I had to drop everything and come immediately,” said Alex Ramirez of Santa Ana. “It really hit me. It happens too frequently with the Angels.”center_img Monday afternoon, Gaynor placed a baseball on the makeshift memorial.“He gave me a baseball, so I brought one for him,” Gaynor said.James Reynolds had brought his wife and two sons for a tour of the stadium when the news broke about Skaggs’ death.“It’s sad for someone so young and their life to be taken so easily,” Reynolds said.Reynolds sat next to his sons in silence.“I don’t know how to explain that one to them,” he said. “I’m at a loss for words.”Ricky and Michael Martinez, brothers from Santa Ana, placed the first roses on the makeshift memorial. They brought a plastic Angels batting helmet that said “LTBU in heaven Tyler.” LTBU refers to lights on the Big A in the parking lot and the way announcer Victor Rojas proclaims an Angels victory, “Light that baby up.”“He was an amazing player,” Ricky Martinez said. “He had his whole career ahead of him.”Roberto Gutierrez of Corona brought a hat from the Corona Pirates, his son’s Little League team.“The guy has been there for us,” Gutierrez said. “We’ve got to be there for him and his family. He’s a good guy. The Angels always have time for us fans. When I heard the news, I told myself I’ve got to go down there.”Ashley Flores of Anaheim was tearful as she took pictures of the memorial with her phone.“I’m devastated,” she said. “You don’t think something like this is going to happen.”last_img read more