The Cheapest Super Bowl Tickets Get The Biggest Markups

AVG. TICKET RESALE PRICESUPER BOWL IS X TIMES MORE EXPENSIVE Super Bowl 50 will be played Sunday at Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara, California, the regular-season home of the San Francisco 49ers. To a bird, Levi’s Stadium looks something like this: Red30610,0679,3263330-7 Yellow1716,6895,1983930-22 Source: SeatGeek SECTION COLOR49ERS HOME GAMESUPER BOWL ON JAN. 27SUPER BOWL ON FEB. 2ON JAN. 27ON FEB. 2∆ FROM JAN. 27 TO FEB. 2 Dark Green$78$3,989$3,7275148-7% Dark Blue1435,2314,4193731-16 Black2247,4396,8363331-8 Middle Blue1314,8274,5973735-5 At the Super Bowl, the cheapest tickets come at the highest added cost. Tickets for the worst seats — in the nosebleed dark-green sections — are selling at 48 times the average resale price for a regular-season 49ers home game. That’s a Super Bowl multiplier higher than anywhere else in the stadium. During the season, those seats retailed for $85 or $106, depending on the game. They resold on SeatGeek for an average of $78. For the Super Bowl, they’re reselling at an average of $3,727.The other most relatively expensive sections are also bad seats — purple (slightly closer but way behind the end zones) and light green (dark green’s marginally better counterpart). Tickets in both those sections are going for 42 and 38 times what they did during the season, respectively.Real “deals” can be found in the gilt-edged red, gold and black sections — close to the action and near midfield. While the average tickets in those sections are going for $9,326, $7,944 and $6,836, respectively, they’re a mere 30, 30 and 31 times more expensive than they were for a regular-season 49ers game. (One exception to this pattern are the über-elite gray “VIP” section tickets, but they’re a small sample — only eight gray tickets are listed on SeatGeek as I write.)This is either a clear case of “you gotta spend money to make money” or a regressive tax that the Bay Area certainly does not need.Over the past week, average resale prices for Super Bowl tickets have fallen in all sections, one by as much as 22 percent. This is evidence that buyers won’t suffer through another “short squeeze” like the one that plagued prices last year for the game at University of Phoenix Stadium. A short squeeze, which is rare for a Super Bowl, can happen when brokers sell speculative tickets early, when prices are high, hoping to cash in when prices dip right before the big game. “We’ll just never allow that to happen again,” a StubHub spokesman told Bloomberg. To a human, ticket prices to sit in various parts of that stadium Sunday look something like this over the past week, according to data provided to me by SeatGeek: Light Green1054,6864,0384538-14 Purple1064,7424,4714542-6 Super Bowl tickets are expensive Gray51321,40219,3974238-9 Gold2659,4497,9443630-16 Light Blue1675,7175,1313431-10 read more

Redskins London Fletcher Likely to Retire After This Season

Photo by The Washington Post.London Fletcher, the undrafted linebacker out of tiny John Carroll University, said he likely will retire after 16 NFL seasons that could land him in the Hall of Fame.Fletcher said at Redskins Park he is  ”99 percent certain” he will quit after the remaining two games. He said he must have one more conversation with his wife to make the decision final.“I felt like I’ve accomplished everything I wanted to accomplish in the National Football League,” Fletcher said.He said he wanted to have a chance to say goodbye to the fans against Dallas in the season’s finale.Quarterback Kirk Cousins told The Washington Post, “We would love to have him walk off that field the last time, if it will be the last time, with a victory.”He accepts that he will not leave the game as fellow linebacker Ray Lewis did with Baltimore last season, with a Super Bowl championship.“I’m not 28,” he said. “I’m 38. I understand that.”Fletcher has played in 254 consecutive games, the most of any active player. He holds the league record for consecutive starts by a linebacker with 214.That is the greatest “part of my legacy” Fletcher said.Redskins coach Mike Shanahan said he “really didn’t know” if Fletcher would walk away after this season. Shanahan said, “I’ve never been around a guy like London who prepares for every game like it’s the Super Bowl.” read more

Man shot killed in alley near Spring Valley

first_img SPRING VALLEY (KUSI) – A man was fatally shot Thursday morning in an alley in the La Presa area south of Spring Valley, authorities said.Dispatchers received multiple reports of gunfire shortly after 1:20 a.m. near the intersection of Delrose Avenue and Elkelton Boulevard, just west of state Route 125, San Diego County Sheriff’s Lt. Karla Menzies said.Deputies responded to the area and found a man lying in an alley near the intersection suffering from at least one gunshot wound, Menzies said.Paramedics responded, but the man, whose age was not immediately available, was pronounced dead at the scene, the lieutenant said.The circumstances leading up to the shooting were under investigation and no suspect descriptions were immediately available.Anyone with information about the shooting was asked to call sheriff’s homicide investigators at (858) 974-2321 or (858) 565-5200 after-hours or on weekends. Tipsters who wish to remain anonymous can contact San Diego Crime Stoppers at (888) 580-8477, or online at sdcrimestoppers.org. Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom, March 21, 2019 Posted: March 21, 2019 KUSI Newsroom Man shot, killed in alley near Spring Valleylast_img read more

Scientists say plants can remember properties of light

first_img Citation: Scientists say plants can remember properties of light (2010, July 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-07-scientists-properties.html More information: via BBC This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further The images showed chemical reactions in leaves that were not exposed to light (PhysOrg.com) — Researchers in Poland say plants are able to remember and react to information on light intensity and quality by transmitting information from leaf to leaf. © 2010 PhysOrg.com Internal clock, external light regulate plant growth The scientists, led by Professor Stanislaw Karpinski of the Warsaw University of Life Sciences, used fluorescence imaging to view the response of specimens of the Arabidopsisa plant to light shone on them. They found that when light was shone on one leaf at the bottom of the plant the entire plant responded. The response, in the form of a cascade of chemical reactions induced by the light, continued even after the light source was removed, suggesting the plant was remembering the information contained in the light.Karpinski and colleagues discovered that when light is shone on a leaf a chemical reaction begins in one leaf cell and the reaction is immediately signaled to the rest of the plant by photo-electro-physiological signals (PEPS) from specialized cells called bundle sheath cells. Karpinski said the cells function in a similar way to a nervous system in animals.Professor Karpinski said animals have a “network of neurons, synapses, electro-physiological circuits and memory, but plants have their network of chloroplasts (connected by stromules), photo-electro-physiological signals transduced by bundle sheath cells, and cellular light memory.”Another discovery made by the team was that the plants responded differently to red, white and blue light. Karpinski thought the different responses might produce chemical reactions that protected the plant against disease. To test this idea the team shone light on the plant for an hour and then infected it with either bacteria or viruses.The results showed that if plants were infected before having the light shone on them there was no resistance to the disease, but if the light was shone on them for an hour and then they were infected 24 hours later, the plants did resist the infection. Karpinski said this demonstrated exposure to the light built up the plant’s immunity to pathogens, and that they were able to adjust to varying light conditions. Karpinski said that the quality of light varies from season to season and it appears the plants might use the information in the light to determine the season and immunize themselves against diseases prevalent at that time of year.The findings were presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Experimental Biology in Prague, Czech Republic.last_img read more