Sludge study kills fears

first_imgThe UGA research group, in collaboration with researchers from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, examined soil and hay from fields to which treated sewage sludge, also known as biosolids, had been applied regularly for periods ranging from one to 12 years. They then compared the data to fields that had never received biosolids applications.Biosolids land application programs are regulated under the Clean Water Act, 43 CFR Part 503, known as the 503 regulations, instituted in 1993.503 regulations”Some individuals have questioned whether the 503 regulations are protective of the public and the environment,” said UGA scientist Julia Gaskin, who headed the research team. “This study puts some of those fears to rest.”The study found that in the soil of treated fields, concentrations of metals like arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercuryfound were statistically the same as those in fields that neverreceived biosolids applications. The same was true of hay grownin most fields treated with biosolids.Three of the fields studied did produce hay with higherconcentrations of cadmium than the National Research Councilrecommends, Gaskin said.Cadmium levelsThese were fields where sludge was applied before 1993, shesaid. They’re likely to have received sludge with high cadmiumlevels. Current regulations would not allow land application ofthat type of sludge.”The recommended cadmium level is set to prevent cadmium fromaccumulating in the food chain from long-term exposure in thehay, and assumes the animals have no other source of food,”Gaskin said. “It would be a problem for food chain accumulationif animals didn’t eat anything but the high cadmium hay grown inthose fields.”The researchers also noted that copper and molybdenum levels were higher in soil from fields treated with biosolids for the longest times. Increased copper could be beneficial for farmers, becausecopper is naturally low in Southeastern soils. There wasn’t asimilar increase of copper levels, however, in the hay grown intreated fields.Copper in hay”While other studies have reported an increase in the copper inhay grown with biosolids fertilizers,” Gaskin said, “the current study did not see a statistically significant increase.”Molybdenum levels, however, were higher in hay from the fieldsreceiving biosolids for the longest times, she said. Highconcentrations of molybdenum can lead to copper deficiency incattle and other ruminants.”The increased molybdenum levels found in the hay in this studywere below levels thought to induce copper deficiencies in mostanimals,” Gaskin said. “Since copper is a necessary nutrient forcattle, we encourage farmers to use copper supplements as a goodmanagement practice.””The study is important because it evaluates the risk of metalcontamination in the soil and hay from farms participating in abiosolids land application program,” Gaskin said. “This studyindicates that the 503 regulations are protective and landapplication programs following the 503 regulations should notpose a risk of metal contamination.”The concerns raised by the study “can be addressed by goodmanagement,” Gaskin said. By Cat HolmesUniversity of GeorgiaToxic levels of heavy metals don’t accumulate in soil or hay when properly treated municipal sewage sludge is used as fertilizer over long periods, according to a new University of Georgia study.last_img read more

Sumner Newscow weekly poll: The permanent city manager question

first_imgDo you approve of making Shane Shields the permanent Wellington City Manager? Yes. He is experienced and knows the town. No. We should have waited and allowed the League of Municipalities to do its job. Ask me again in a year. View Results  Loading …Follow us on Facebook.Follow us on Twitter. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comment (1) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. +8 Vote up Vote down mom2mykids · 210 weeks ago He is more than qualified for the job…I think its a waste of money paying someone to find us a City Manager..when we have someone that has picked up the pieces more than once in the past dealing with no city manager before. Report Reply 0 replies · active 210 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more

Former MP CM Babulal Gaur cremated with full state honours

first_imgBhopal: The mortal remains of former Madhya Pradesh chief minister Babulal Gaur were consigned to flames here on Wednesday. Governor Lalji Tandon, Union ministers Narendra Singh Tomar, Thawarchand Gehlot and Nityanand Rai, BJP vice president Shivraj Singh Chouhan and state BJP chief Rakesh Singh were among those present along with hundreds of party workers. Gaur was cremated at Subhash Nagar crematorium with full state honours. The last rites were performed by his grandson Akash. The veteran BJP leader died due to cardiac arrest on Wednesday morning at a private hospital here. The Congress government in Madhya Pradesh declared a three-day mourning in the state. The government also declared a half-day holiday at all government offices on Wednesday. Chief minister Kamal Nath and many state ministers visited Gaur’s house here in the morning to pay homage.last_img read more

Ram Katha redefined

first_imgEver thought of Ramayana depicted entirely through paintings? Well, more than 101 Ramayana based paintings are on display at National Museum titled as Rama Katha — The story of Rama through Indian miniatures.The paintings created between  17-19 century depicts various parts of Valmiki’s story like, the Portrait of Rama, Hanuman carrying the Dongiri mountain Rama breaking the Shiva’s bow in king Janak’s court, Rama, Laxman and the golden deer, fire ordeal of Sita, Ravan on his golden throne among others. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The paintings also throw light on varied interpretations of the same story across stylistic genres like Pahari style, Kalighat style, Rajasthani style, Moughal style and many more. The paintings have been collected from various parts of India and more than 70 paintings are on display for the first time. The selection of art work has been done carefully so that each style is exhibited and viewers can compare, understand and imbibe the styles.The exhibition promises to be an experience of different styles of miniature paintings. Later this year, these paintings will travel to Royal Museum of Art and History at Brussels in Belgium, to be displayed.last_img read more

Yogarelated injuries on the rise

first_imgThe number of people with serious Yoga-related injuries are on the rise, according to an Australian study that warns people to practice yogic poses with caution. Researchers from Central Queensland University in Australia analysed all yoga injuries presented at emergency departments between 2009 and 2016 in Victoria.They found that Yoga-related injuries that were serious enough to land people in local emergency department rose by almost 80 per cent during that time and ranged mainly from knee injuries, shoulder dislocations to head and neck injuries. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”I think people know the correct technique, but they might be pushing themselves too early, especially if you look into the influencers on social media,” said Betul Sekendiz of Central Queensland University.”There is a high focus on pictures to attract likes, so people may be pushing themselves without enough preparation or warm up to get into those poses just for the sake of a picture,” said Sekendiz.”I think on social media, the most frequent pose we see females performing is the headstand,” he said. The study found 66 recorded cases of yoga injuries and almost 10 per cent of those injuries were serious enough for the person to be admitted to hospital for further treatment. “I am not saying we should stop doing yoga, but we need to look into what’s going wrong here,” Sekendiz said. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveAn article published in The New York Times investigating the prevalence of yoga-related injuries found that several factors seem to be related to the rising number of pulls, tears and sprains prevalent among yogis. A major contributing factor is a shift in both those who teach and practice yoga. More than ever before, adults who are mostly otherwise sedentary and unfamiliar with the practice are turning to yoga to improve flexibility and strength. While this can be helpful in many instances when students are properly guided, a tight, inactive or aging body mixed with a vigorous practice or an experienced teacher can also sometimes serve as a recipe for disaster. “As with any other form of physical practice, yoga should be practiced carefully under the guidance of a qualified instructor in order to reduce risk. If you’ve been injured in the past, or have been mostly sedentary, consider skipping some of the riskiest poses all together”, suggests draxe.com.Five ways to avoid injuries1. Gently stretch tight areasStretching (and similar dynamic movements like calisthenics) should always be done mindfully, gently and slowing. Take your time loosening tight areas — such as the hips, calves or hamstring — being careful not to move too quickly into any poses. Try to warm the body up before any vigorous practice with some dynamic stretching, since this helps to loosen muscles that might be prone to pulls. It’s okay to feel mild to moderate resistance while stretching or bending, but be careful not to push past your limits.2. Reduce muscular compensations through regular strength-trainingIn addition to doing yoga, resistance-training and “functional exercise” can help reduce compensations by building strength in weak areas. Focus on regularly doing cardiovascular and full-body resistance exercises several times per week based on your physical abilities. 3. Practice yoga cautiously (Especially if you’re a beginner)You should always practice yoga with a trained and qualified teacher, but still be careful to listen to your body during practice. Don’t assume that any teacher knows exactly how to modify postures to suit your specific needs, and don’t assume that you should be able to bend or move in ways that other students can.4. Consider sticking to gentler stylesIf you’re susceptible to dizziness, muscle cramps or the effects of heat and dehydration, keep in mind that hot yoga (Bikram) might not be the best match for you. Try to ease your way into any yoga practice by attending basic/beginner classes or workshops, or even trying restorative/yin yoga at first which move at a slower pace.5. Use props for supportProps including yoga blocks, straps, blankets or even a wall or chair can really come in handy. These are especially useful for yoga newbies, the elderly or those recovering from injuries.last_img read more

Does it make sense to talk about DevOps engineers or DevOps tools

first_imgDevOps engineers are in high demand – the job represents an engineering unicorn, someone that understands both development and operations and can help to foster a culture where the relationship between the two is almost frictionless. But there’s some debate as to whether it makes sense to talk about a DevOps engineer at all. If DevOps is a culture of a set of practices that improves agility and empowers engineers to take more ownership over their work, should we really be thinking about DevOps as a single job that someone can simply train for? The quotes in this piece are taken from DevOps Paradox by Viktor Farcic, which will be published in June 2019. The book features interviews with a diverse range of figures drawn from across the DevOps world. Is DevOps engineer a ‘real’ job or just recruitment spin? Nirmal Mehta (@normalfaults), Technology Consultant at Booz Allen Hamilton, says “There’s no such thing as a DevOps engineer. There shouldn’t even be a DevOps team, because to me DevOps is more of a cultural and philosophical methodology, a process, and a way of thinking about things and communicating within an IT organization…” Mehta is cyncical about organizations that put out job descriptions asking for DevOps engineers. It is, he argues, a way of cutting costs – a way of simply doing more with less. “A DevOps engineer is just a job posting that signals an organization wants to hire one less person to do twice as much work rather than hire both a developer and an operator.” This view is echoed by other figures associated with the DevOps world. Mike Kail (@mdkail), CTO at Everest, says “I certainly don’t view DevOps as a tool or a job title. In my view, at the core, it’s a cultural approach to leveraging automation and orchestration to streamline both code development, infrastructure, application deployments and subsequently, the managing of those resources.” Similarly, Damian Duportal (@DamienDuportal), Træfik’s Developer Advocate, says “there is no such thing as a DevOps engineer or even a DevOps team.  The main purpose of DevOps is to focus on value, finding the optimal for the organization, and the value it will bring.” For both Duportal and Kail, then, DevOps is primarily a cultural thing, something which needs to be embedded inside the practices of an organization. Is it useful to talk about a DevOps team? There are big question marks over the concept of a DevOps engineer. But what about a specific team? It’s all well and good talking about organizational philosophy, but how do you actually affect change in a practical manner? Julian Simpson (@builddoctor), Neo4J’s Global IT Manager is sceptical about the concept of a DevOps team: “Can we have something called a DevOps team? I don’t believe so. You might spin up a team to solve a DevOps problem, but then I wouldn’t even say we specifically have a DevOps problem. I’d say you just have a problem.” DevOps consultant Chris Riley (@HoardingInfo) has a similar take, saying: “DevOps Engineer as a title makes sense to me, but I don’t think you necessarily have DevOps departments, nor do you seek that out. Instead, I think DevOps is a principle that you spread throughout your entire development organization. Rather, you look to reform your organization in a way that supports those initiatives versus just saying that we need to build this DevOps unit, and there we go, we’re done, we’re DevOps. Because by doing that you really have to empower that unit and most organizations aren’t willing to do that.” However, Red Hat Solutions Architect Wian Vos  (@wianvos) has a different take. For Vos the idea of a DevOps team is actually crucial if you are to cultivate a DevOps mindset inside your organization: “Imagine… you and I were going to start a company. We’re going to need a DevOps team because we have a burning desire to put out this awesome application. The questions we have when we’re putting together a DevOps team is both ‘Who are we hiring?’ and ‘What are we hiring for? Are we going to hire DevOps engineers? No. In that team, we want the best application developers, the best tester, and maybe we want a great infrastructure guy and a frontend/backend developer. I want people with specific roles who fit together as a team to be that DevOps team.” For Vos, it’s not so much about finding and hiring DevOps engineers – people with a specific set of skills and experience – but rather building a team that’s constructed in such a way that it can put DevOps principles into practice. Is there such a thing as a DevOps tool? One of the interesting things about DevOps is that the debate seems to lead you into a bit of a bind. It’s almost as if the more concrete we try and make it – turning it into a job, or a team – the less useful it becomes. This is particularly true when we consider tooling. Surely thinking about DevOps technologically, rather than speculatively makes it more real? In general, it appears there is a consensus against the idea of DevOps tools. On this point Julian Simpson said “my original thinking about the movement from 2009 onwards, when the name was coined, was that it would be about collaboration and perhaps the tools would sort of come out of that collaboration.” James Turnbull (@kartar), CEO of Rethink Robotics is critical of the notion of DevOps tools. He says “I don’t think there are such things as DevOps tools. I believe there are tools that make the process of being a cross-functional team better… Any tool that facilitates building that cross-functionality is probably a DevOps tool to the point where the term is likely meaningless.” When it comes to DevOps, everyone’s still learning With even industry figures disagreeing on what terms mean, or which ones are relevant, it’s pretty clear that DevOps will remain a field that’s contested and debated. But perhaps this is important – if we expect it to simply be a solution to the engineering challenges we face, it’s already failed as a concept. However, if we understand it as a framework or mindset for solving problems then that is when it acquires greater potency. Viktor Farcic is a Developer Advocate at CloudBees, a member of the Google Developer Experts and Docker Captains groups, and published author. His big passions are DevOps, Microservices, Continuous Integration, Delivery and Deployment (CI/CD) and Test-Driven Development (TDD).last_img read more