Talk debates “Chief” mascot

first_imgThe controversial removal of the University of Illinois’ American Indian mascot served as the foundation for a discussion on free expression, hate and discrimination at a lecture Monday.The talk, “Curating Beyond the Chief: Hating Art and Words in Public,” took place at the Hesburgh Center for International Studies.The controversy over the long-held “Chief” mascot climaxed in 2007 when the university retired the mascot in response to pressures from a National Collegiate Athletic Association rule.But Professor Robert Warrior, director of Native American Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, said this removal came much too late. Many other universities had begun removal of native mascots as early as the 1980s, he said.The growing tension over the mascot debate on campus led Warrior to begin planning an on-campus exhibit with artist Edgar Heap of Birds, renowned especially for his work with Native American themes and social commentary.“Campus climate was growing more intolerant of difference because of the controversy,” Warrior said.Warrior asked Heap of Birds to bring his work to campus, which included a series of signs that commemorated the indigenous people who previously held the land.The project began with a dialogue between Warrior, Heap of Birds, students and faculty over what would be the most effective way to make a statement about the Native issue on campus. Through this dialogue, Warrior said he realized it was not only necessary to make a statement, but also to be informative to themselves and the rest of the campus community through the project.“We recognized in our discussion how little we knew about these people,” he said.The exhibit, entitled “Beyond the Chief,” read “Fighting Illini: Today Your Host is…” followed by the name of one of the native tribes that used to inhabit the state.After the exhibit’s installation, the signs were vandalized, bent and even stolen, Warrior said.In response to the vandalization and thefts, Heap of Birds returned to the campus to have a dialogue about the issue. The Community Relations Service (CRS), a division of the Department of Justice also became involved, as the acts were deemed hate crimes since they targeted the Native American community.“The CRS was concerned about escalation,” Warrior said.Heap of Bird and the Department of Justice’s efforts proved insufficient to end the vandalism, as signs continued to be damaged, resulting in a new design for the exhibit, believed to be less easily damaged.“The new signs, fabricated in the style of highway signs and under 24/7 surveillance, seemed to stop the vandalism,” Warrior said.The vandalism, Warrior said, was caused by individuals’ disapproval and discomfort with a discussion of Native American issues, and a widespread problem of white privilege.Warrior said the simple presence of an exhibit dealing with Native American heritage sparked controversy and violent acts on campus.“White supremacy, white privilege, and racism … I see as systemic and pervasive,” he said.With regard to the continued movement for the removal of Native-caricature mascots on other college campuses, Warrior said the movements should be equally broad.“Things really work best when there’s some kind of grass roots effort,” he said.last_img read more

ND explains lack of medical amnesty

first_imgShortly before senior Kat Rodriguez’s last home football game as a student, she was returning to a tailgate near Notre Dame Stadium when she tripped on a bicycle and gashed open her forehead. Blood and beer spilled to the ground as Rodriguez, who was of legal drinking age, fell to the ground. Senior Tom Burns and a friend saw Rodriguez fall and helped her to a Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP) officer. But before doing so, a thought crossed Burns’ mind — Would Rodriguez, or his friend who was intoxicated and underage, get in trouble? “For a split second, it crossed my mind,” Burns said. Burns ignored that thought and sought medical treatment for Rodriguez, who received stitches at a local hospital for her injury. As a result of Burns’ action, an NDSP officer nearly arrested Burns’ underage friend and Rodriguez received disciplinary action from the University for being intoxicated in public. Dozens of schools across the country — including Notre Dame’s sister school Saint Mary’s College — have policies in place to formally protect students like Rodriguez, Burns and Burns’ friend from getting in trouble with the University when seeking out or receiving medical treatment. Notre Dame is not one of them. The Notre Dame philosophy When Notre Dame was considering revising its student handbook, du Lac, in 2010, student government advocated for the inclusion of some form of medical amnesty. After discussing both a medical amnesty policy, which protects the student needing medical assistance, and a Good Samaritan policy, which protects the student who seeks out assistance for the student in need, student government recommended the inclusion of the Good Samaritan policy. Both Student Senate and Council of Representatives, a body comprised of students and rector representatives, passed resolutions recommending the policy. Across the United States, approximately 90 colleges and universities have some form of a medical amnesty policy — many of which focus on alcohol use or drug use — according to Students for Sensible Drug Policy, an international group of students who say they are concerned about drug use and push for sensible drug policies. However, the administration opted not to include such a policy in its du Lac revisions. Since the Office of Student Affairs and the Office of Residence Life, which handles student conduct and discipline, underwent major changes in organization and leadership in the past year and a half, the University’s position on a medical amnesty policy has not changed. Brian Coughlin, the associate vice president for student development who also oversees the Office of Residence Life, said the administration decided not to adopt the medical amnesty policy because it is essentially built into the University’s disciplinary system. When a student is charged with a violation, he or she undergoes an evaluation process in the Office of Residence Life, during which “the nature of the offense and the circumstances surrounding it … will be among the factors considered in determining a sanction,” according to du Lac’s website. While student government wanted a more formal policy in place, Coughlin said some questioned why a medical amnesty policy would be needed at Notre Dame, “where the spirit of Christian community is so strong.” “It is hard to fathom one Notre Dame student acting so much out of a perceived self-interest that they may not help a fellow student in need because they are more worried about potential discipline,” Coughlin said. “I recall one statement that questioned what kind of place Notre Dame would become if we have to start legislating and putting conditions on care and compassion for one another.” Several faith-affiliated schools, such as Texas Christian University, Southern Methodist University and Fordham University, have a form of medical amnesty policy, according to their websites and student handbooks. Across the street at Saint Mary’s College, which was founded by the same religious congregation as Notre Dame, students are protected under both medical amnesty and Good Samaritan policies. The Saint Mary’s philosophy Saint Mary’s College implemented its medical amnesty and Good Samaritan policies in 2008, according to Janielle Tchakerian, director of Residence Life and Community Standards for Saint Mary’s. Since then, she said students take advantage of the policies every year. “Our goal is to make sure a student who needs assistance gets assistance, and secondary to hold students responsible for potential violation of the code,” Tchakerian said. “Every student that I’ve talked to knows not to be afraid to call for help.” Saint Mary’s policies cover alcohol or drug-related emergencies. They do not cover a situation in which nobody seeks help for a student, and they do not protect the student if she breaks another College rule, Tchakerian said. Tchakerian said such policies do not conflict with the College’s Catholic teaching, but rather supplement it. “It reinforces doing the right thing and the College supports doing the right thing,” she said. “It only reinforces the [Christian] philosophy.” Tchakerian said these policies protect Saint Mary’s students wherever the emergency takes place — even if it occurs on Notre Dame’s campus. “Because she is a Saint Mary’s student, she falls under our rules regardless of where that action occurs,” she said. Shaping the conversation Without a formal policy in place at Notre Dame, students who would have been protected under the medical amnesty policy could be referred to the Office of Residence Life, which has wiggle room to make sanctions lighter, or stronger, depending on the circumstances surrounding the rule violation. Kathleen O’Leary, director of the Office of Residence Life, said her office strives for a “delicate balance” between prioritizing student safety and upholding expectations that students comply with University policies. “The decision to seek out that medical assistance for self or others will definitely be a part of the conversation,” O’Leary said. “While it may not necessarily erase a student’s responsibility for violating a policy, it will shape our conversation and perhaps impact the outcomes from our office.” O’Leary said her office does not have data on the outcomes of cases in which the student would have been protected under medical amnesty. 2011 graduate Nick Ruof, former student government senator and student body chief of staff, said he was initially disappointed when the University rejected student government’s 2010 recommendation to include medical amnesty. Ruof was left wondering if the process the University had in place was enough. However, the next year, Ruof served as student body chief of staff and had the opportunity to look at the inner workings of the disciplinary process, which changed his mind. “From being able to talk to the administration, get to know the administration, have those deeper conversations … I was extremely confident that they were looking out for us — as much as Res Life gets a bad rap,” he said. “I was comfortable knowing they were taking it all into consideration.” Looking to the future When the University finalized du Lac revisions in 2010, a major window of opportunity for policy reform closed. As a result, student body president Pat McCormick could not effectively push for the implementation of a medical amnesty policy as previous student government administrations did. Nonetheless, McCormick said he has not let the issue completely drop off the radar. “We continue to advocate in whatever ways are available to us to try and incorporate policy changes that will focus on student safety rather than on trying to discipline students in emergency situations,” he said. For example, the Office of Residence Life is currently under review and McCormick said he used this as an opportunity to open up discussion about medical amnesty and express the student body’s support for the policy. Coughlin said the current review is not of policies, such as medical amnesty, but rather a review of the disciplinary process as a whole. However, McCormick said active communication with the administration during the review could be helpful. “It is a valuable opportunity to reflect on ways to increase transparency and clarity on all sides of the process,” he said. While McCormick said he trusts Notre Dame students to put a hurt or sick friend’s well-being before their own concerns, he would like to see more transparency in the disciplinary process so students can “know not only their rights, but also know their responsibilities.” “I really deeply believe that Notre Dame students are committed to doing the right thing,” he said. “But I think Notre Dame students … have legitimate questions about the clarity in reforms and in increasing the transparency of the process.” As for Rodriguez, her main concern after her injury and getting a University sanction, called a Res Life, was not for herself, but for Burns and his friend. “My Res Life, I can deal with because I did something stupid and I made a mistake, but those guys didn’t have to help me at all and they went out of their way to help me,” she said. “The fact the those guys had to even think that they might get in trouble for that is really upsetting.” Meanwhile, Burns said if a medical amnesty policy had been in place, it could have changed the way he approached the situation. “Obviously if there was amnesty in place, there is not a second thought about helping someone out,” he said. “I’m not sure if that would have changed the officers’ behavior, maybe it would have changed our thought process.” According to a previous Observer article, du Lac is reviewed every six to eight years, making the next opportunity for revision likely in 2016. The Office of Residence Life holds open office hours Fridays from 11 a.m. to noon in 306 Main Building to give students an opportunity to discuss the current review of the disciplinary process.,Shortly before senior Kat Rodriguez’s last home football game as a student, she was returning to a tailgate near Notre Dame Stadium when she tripped on a bicycle and gashed open her forehead. Blood and beer spilled to the ground as Rodriguez, who was of legal drinking age, fell to the ground. Senior Tom Burns and a friend saw Rodriguez fall and helped her to a Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP) officer. But before doing so, a thought crossed Burns’ mind — Would Rodriguez, or his friend who was intoxicated and underage, get in trouble? “For a split second, it crossed my mind,” Burns said. Burns ignored that thought and sought medical treatment for Rodriguez, who received stitches at a local hospital for her injury. As a result of Burns’ action, an NDSP officer nearly arrested Burns’ underage friend and Rodriguez received disciplinary action from the University for being intoxicated in public. Dozens of schools across the country — including Notre Dame’s sister school Saint Mary’s College — have policies in place to formally protect students like Rodriguez, Burns and Burns’ friend from getting in trouble with the University when seeking out or receiving medical treatment. Notre Dame is not one of them. The Notre Dame philosophy When Notre Dame was considering revising its student handbook, du Lac, in 2010, student government advocated for the inclusion of some form of medical amnesty. After discussing both a medical amnesty policy, which protects the student needing medical assistance, and a Good Samaritan policy, which protects the student who seeks out assistance for the student in need, student government recommended the inclusion of the Good Samaritan policy. Both Student Senate and Council of Representatives, a body comprised of students and rector representatives, passed resolutions recommending the policy. Across the United States, approximately 90 colleges and universities have some form of a medical amnesty policy — many of which focus on alcohol use or drug use — according to Students for Sensible Drug Policy, an international group of students who say they are concerned about drug use and push for sensible drug policies. However, the administration opted not to include such a policy in its du Lac revisions. Since the Office of Student Affairs and the Office of Residence Life, which handles student conduct and discipline, underwent major changes in organization and leadership in the past year and a half, the University’s position on a medical amnesty policy has not changed. Brian Coughlin, the associate vice president for student development who also oversees the Office of Residence Life, said the administration decided not to adopt the medical amnesty policy because it is essentially built into the University’s disciplinary system. When a student is charged with a violation, he or she undergoes an evaluation process in the Office of Residence Life, during which “the nature of the offense and the circumstances surrounding it … will be among the factors considered in determining a sanction,” according to du Lac’s website. While student government wanted a more formal policy in place, Coughlin said some questioned why a medical amnesty policy would be needed at Notre Dame, “where the spirit of Christian community is so strong.” “It is hard to fathom one Notre Dame student acting so much out of a perceived self-interest that they may not help a fellow student in need because they are more worried about potential discipline,” Coughlin said. “I recall one statement that questioned what kind of place Notre Dame would become if we have to start legislating and putting conditions on care and compassion for one another.” Several faith-affiliated schools, such as Texas Christian University, Southern Methodist University and Fordham University, have a form of medical amnesty policy, according to their websites and student handbooks. Across the street at Saint Mary’s College, which was founded by the same religious congregation as Notre Dame, students are protected under both medical amnesty and Good Samaritan policies. The Saint Mary’s philosophy Saint Mary’s College implemented its medical amnesty and Good Samaritan policies in 2008, according to Janielle Tchakerian, director of Residence Life and Community Standards for Saint Mary’s. Since then, she said students take advantage of the policies every year. “Our goal is to make sure a student who needs assistance gets assistance, and secondary to hold students responsible for potential violation of the code,” Tchakerian said. “Every student that I’ve talked to knows not to be afraid to call for help.” Saint Mary’s policies cover alcohol or drug-related emergencies. They do not cover a situation in which nobody seeks help for a student, and they do not protect the student if she breaks another College rule, Tchakerian said. Tchakerian said such policies do not conflict with the College’s Catholic teaching, but rather supplement it. “It reinforces doing the right thing and the College supports doing the right thing,” she said. “It only reinforces the [Christian] philosophy.” Tchakerian said these policies protect Saint Mary’s students wherever the emergency takes place — even if it occurs on Notre Dame’s campus. “Because she is a Saint Mary’s student, she falls under our rules regardless of where that action occurs,” she said. Shaping the conversation Without a formal policy in place at Notre Dame, students who would have been protected under the medical amnesty policy could be referred to the Office of Residence Life, which has wiggle room to make sanctions lighter, or stronger, depending on the circumstances surrounding the rule violation. Kathleen O’Leary, director of the Office of Residence Life, said her office strives for a “delicate balance” between prioritizing student safety and upholding expectations that students comply with University policies. “The decision to seek out that medical assistance for self or others will definitely be a part of the conversation,” O’Leary said. “While it may not necessarily erase a student’s responsibility for violating a policy, it will shape our conversation and perhaps impact the outcomes from our office.” O’Leary said her office does not have data on the outcomes of cases in which the student would have been protected under medical amnesty. 2011 graduate Nick Ruof, former student government senator and student body chief of staff, said he was initially disappointed when the University rejected student government’s 2010 recommendation to include medical amnesty. Ruof was left wondering if the process the University had in place was enough. However, the next year, Ruof served as student body chief of staff and had the opportunity to look at the inner workings of the disciplinary process, which changed his mind. “From being able to talk to the administration, get to know the administration, have those deeper conversations … I was extremely confident that they were looking out for us — as much as Res Life gets a bad rap,” he said. “I was comfortable knowing they were taking it all into consideration.” Looking to the future When the University finalized du Lac revisions in 2010, a major window of opportunity for policy reform closed. As a result, student body president Pat McCormick could not effectively push for the implementation of a medical amnesty policy as previous student government administrations did. Nonetheless, McCormick said he has not let the issue completely drop off the radar. “We continue to advocate in whatever ways are available to us to try and incorporate policy changes that will focus on student safety rather than on trying to discipline students in emergency situations,” he said. For example, the Office of Residence Life is currently under review and McCormick said he used this as an opportunity to open up discussion about medical amnesty and express the student body’s support for the policy. Coughlin said the current review is not of policies, such as medical amnesty, but rather a review of the disciplinary process as a whole. However, McCormick said active communication with the administration during the review could be helpful. “It is a valuable opportunity to reflect on ways to increase transparency and clarity on all sides of the process,” he said. While McCormick said he trusts Notre Dame students to put a hurt or sick friend’s well-being before their own concerns, he would like to see more transparency in the disciplinary process so students can “know not only their rights, but also know their responsibilities.” “I really deeply believe that Notre Dame students are committed to doing the right thing,” he said. “But I think Notre Dame students … have legitimate questions about the clarity in reforms and in increasing the transparency of the process.” As for Rodriguez, her main concern after her injury and getting a University sanction, commonly called a Res Life, was not for herself, but for Burns and his friend. “My Res Life, I can deal with because I did something stupid and I made a mistake, but those guys didn’t have to help me at all and they went out of their way to help me,” she said. “The fact the those guys had to even think that they might get in trouble for that is really upsetting.” Meanwhile, Burns said if a medical amnesty policy had been in place, it could have changed the way he approached the situation. “Obviously if there was amnesty in place, there is not a second thought about helping someone out,” he said. “I’m not sure if that would have changed the officers’ behavior, maybe it would have changed our thought process.” According to a previous Observer article, du Lac is reviewed every six to eight years, making the next opportunity for revision likely in 2016. The Office of Residence Life holds open office hours Fridays from 11 a.m. to noon in 306 Main Building to give students an opportunity to discuss the current review of the disciplinary process.last_img read more

Ricketts-Ruelas to serve as president, VP

first_imgMichael Yu | The Observer Campaign season for student body president and vice president ended Wednesday night as Judicial Council announced that juniors Bryan Ricketts and Nidia Ruelas had defeated sophomores Neil Joseph and Noemi Ventilla by 351 votes.According to Judicial Council, Ricketts and Ruelas garnered 1,908 votes, which came out to approximately 51 percent. Joseph and Ventilla received 1,557 votes or 41.62 percent of the vote, while 276 or 7.38 percent of voters abstained, up from 5.1 percent who abstained in the 2014 election.Overall, 3,741 students voted in the election, with a voter participation rate of 45 percent, consistent with the results of last year’s election.Michael Masi, class of 2014, former president of Judicial Council, said in an interview last year that a ticket must have a minimum of 50 percent of the vote to prevent the election from going to a runoff.Last year, neither the Vidal-Devine ticket nor the LaMagna-Andresen ticket received a majority, and so another election was held five days later. Despite earning more votes than the Joseph-Ventilla ticket, had Ricketts and Ruelas failed to meet the requirement of a 50 percent majority, this year’s election would have proceeded to a runoff.Reflecting on the week, Ruelas, the vice-president elect, said she had most enjoyed speaking to potential constituents and friends who had helped on the campaign.“I’m just incredibly humbled by this whole experience,” Ruelas said. “I’ve met some of the most incredible people on campus throughout this whole time, and it’s reinforced some of the best friendships I’ve made in my entire life. Thank you to everyone who came out. Every single vote counted, and it was — there’s no words.”Ricketts, who will serve as president, described his and Ruelas’s campaign as a group effort. Like Ruelas, he also described meeting with students as a high point of the campaign experience.“We definitely want to thank our friends and supporters who worked so hard for this, it definitely wouldn’t have happened without them,” Ricketts said. “It’s been great, over the past week, meeting with so many people on campus and already getting to start sharing their vision. We’ve had so many good conversations about the items on our platform and about things that aren’t even on there.”When asked, Joseph said he and Ventilla, Sophomore Class Council treasurer and president, respectively, would not pursue offices in the Junior Class Council for the upcoming school year, but he said they hope to find ways to implement the ideas from their platform in other ways.“We’re still really passionate about our ideas and the things we set out to do, and we think these things will be beneficial for all students,” Joseph said. “We’re not thinking about next year or anything like that, but we really want to get these things done. We’re going to try — we don’t know how at this point — right now we’re just processing things and looking forward.”Moving forward, Ricketts said in the next few weeks he and Ruelas will focus on putting together a staff and cabinet.“That is definitely the priority,” he said. “Finding people who are just as passionate as we are will be crucial to making sure we can be effective next year.”Ricketts and Ruelas officially take office April 1.Tags: Judicial Council, Ricketts-Ruelas, Student Body President, student body vice presidentlast_img read more

Students, faculty gather to share poetry in the spirit of Sister Madeleva

first_imgMargaret Cicchiello | The Observer Sr. Eva Hooker stands with a Saint John’s Bible, the page turned to an image of Mary Magdalene meeting Jesus in the garden, a scene featured in her poem “Mary Magdalene.”Laura Haigwood, chair of the English department at Saint Mary’s, organized and promoted the event. Haigwood said the reading was held in the spirit of Sister M. Madeleva Wolff, the third president of the College, who was also a renowned and respected poet.“Tonight we gather to experience [and] celebrate … as Sister Madeleva, especially, would wish us to do by making space and taking time for beauty,” Haigwood said.Hooker introduced her colleague to the audience and said Lehmann’s second book “Ringer” was the “winner of one of the most prestigious prizes given to a poet, the Donald Hall Prize for Poetry.” The Donald Hall Prize for Poetry, which was awarded to Lehmann in 2018, is an opportunity for authors that includes a cash prize and the publication of their book. “We are gathered here tonight to celebrate Rebecca’s gift for making poems,” Hooker said.Hooker then said she remembered spending a Sunday reading “Ringer” and praising Lehmann’s “gift for the unveiling of the soul.” Lehmann recited ten poems, including “Ringer,” in which she experimented with repetition and recounted early days with her son, “Two Beauties,” a poem recounting staying with her father and grandfather as a child, and “Epithalamion.”When introducing Hooker, Lehmann said Hooker’s poems are “firmly grounded in nature” and that Hooker’s language “is sometimes minimalistic but always powerfully present.” Before she began, Hooker explained to the audience that she was “taking a risk” because she was reading fairly new work. Providing context, Hooker said she was “on the Atlantic” for these poems, near where she lived when she completed a T.S. Eliot residency this summer. Hooker read works titled “Sea Rose,” “The Offing,” “Mary Magdalene” and “Live Coal In My Mouth.” There was a Saint John’s Bible present at the event, and Hooker used an illustration of Mary Magdalene meeting Jesus in the garden to underline the content of her poem “Mary Magdalene.”Lehmann said her perception of the world has changed as she has grown, as reflected in her poetry.“When I was younger, I was a lot more cynical and pessimistic about the world,” she said. When giving context for the titular poem “Ringer,” she said that she “put aside her former self” as she entered a new stage in her life, namely, the birth of her two children.Hooker said her poetry has also changed over time.“I’d say my poetry has gotten quieter as the years have gone by,” Hooker said. “I’m much more interested in how we move in nature … in how caring for the earth is also a spiritual practice.”Sophomore Natalie Davis said she was excited to support these individuals and reflect on the unique experiences and universal themes in their work.“Events like this are important because they help get staff members noticed and they help the students realize that this is something they can do,” Davis said.Haigwood praised the presenting poets’ works as contributing to the College’s community and offering spiritual insights.“Professor Rebecca Lehmann’s award-winning second book ‘Ringer’ resonates with faculty and students at Saint Mary’s because she is a valued member of our intellectual and creative community whose exquisitely crafted poetry engages both timely and timeless topics, and does so from the sensitively critical perspective of a thoughtful, perceptive, articulate, contemporary American woman,” Haigwood said. “Similarly, Sister Eva Hooker’s poetry gives us finely wrought insight into the spiritual substance of human being, informed by her profoundly observant and generative Catholic perspective.” Tags: Mary Magdalene, Poetry, Rebecca Lehmann, Ringer, Sister Eva Hooker, Sister Madeleva Wolff Students and faculty gathered to hear professor of English Rebecca Lehmann and Sister Eva Hooker read their poetry Tuesday. This event, co-sponsored by the English and gender and women’s studies departments, recognized two gifted members of Saint Mary’s faculty and also served as book launch for Lehmann’s book, “Ringer.”last_img read more

Campus Ministry suspends public Masses

first_imgFr. Pete McCormick, director of Campus Ministry, announced the suspension of public Masses in the Basilica of the Sacred Heart and elsewhere on campus, in an email Tuesday.“This is not a decision taken lightly, but it is one that is necessary,” McCormick said in the email.He invited the Notre Dame community to unite in prayer virtually with the priests of the Congregation of the Holy Cross.Mass on Sundays will be livestreamed on Catholic TV at 10 a.m. EST, and Mass on Mondays through Saturdays will be livestreamed from the Basilica at 11:30 a.m. EST.“I hope that the Mass, from the heart of Notre Dame, can be a source of grace and comfort for you,” McCormick said. “As Fr. John shared in his message, we will keep a candle lit at the Grotto for you and your family. You are in our prayers.”Tags: Campus Ministry, coronavirus, COVID-19, Fr. Pete McCormicklast_img read more

Reed’s Outdoor Bill Signed By President Trump

first_imgPresident Donald Trump displays his signature after signing The Great American Outdoors Act on Tuesday, August 4, 2020, in the East Room of the White House. (Official White House Photo by Tia Dufour)WASHINGTON — Congressman Tom Reed joined President Donald Trump on Tuesday for the signing of the Great American Outdoors Act.The Problem Solvers endorsed bill became law during the White House ceremony.Reed co-sponsored the legislation, and the Problem Solvers Caucus, which Reed co-chairs, endorsed the bill in July.“We care about the preservation and conservation of our country’s natural treasures, landmarks, wildlife, and public lands,” Reed said “By securing annual funding to eliminate a backlog of maintenance at our national parks and historical sites, this legislation will ensure generations of future Americans will be able to enjoy everything our great nation has to offer. We appreciate the administration’s ongoing leadership on this issue and will continue to fight in a bipartisan manner to protect our environment.” Trump acknowledged the natural beauty found in all areas of the nation.“The Great American Outdoors Act provides $900 million a year in guaranteed funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund so that all Americans can continue to enjoy our parks, wildlife refuges.  I mean, if you look at this, if you look at what we do with our wildlife, and — it’s really been incredible.  So all of the wildlife areas, the wildlife parks, historic battlefields, national monuments, and public lands,” he said at the signing. “Additionally, this bill provides nearly $10 billion for long-delayed maintenance projects, repairs, and upgrades to make the national parks greater than they have ever been before.  We think that’s going to happen.”“The Great American Outdoors Act is the conservation bill of a generation. ACC’s members thank Representative Reed for his leadership and commitment to protecting our nation’s parks and public lands,” said Quill Robinson, Vice President of Government Affairs, American Conservation Coalition.The conservation bill is designed to ensure public lands are protected and preserved. The bipartisan legislation will provide full, permanent funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) at a level of $900 million every year and address the approximately $20 billion maintenance backlog on federal public lands. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Tickets Now on Sale for Broadway Premiere of Terrence McNally’s Mothers and Sons, Starring Tyne Daly

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on June 22, 2014 Mothers and Sons What happens to the family when a loved one dies and their partner moves on to start a new life? You’ll need to be at the Golden Theatre to find out. Tickets are now on sale for the previously announced Broadway mounting of Terrence McNally’s newest play, Mothers and Sons, starring Tony winner Tyne Daly. Directed by Tony nominee Sheryl Kaller (Next Fall), the drama will begin performances on February 23. Related Shows Bobby Steggert Star Files View Comments The intimate cast features Daly (most recently seen on Broadway in Master Class), Tony nominee Bobby Steggert (most recently seen on Broadway in Big Fish) and Frederick Weller. Opening night is set for March 24 at the Golden Theatre, so grab your mothers, your sons, heck your whole family (little ones excluded), and get ready for some serious drama. In Mothers and Sons, Weller plays Cal Porter and Steggert plays his younger husband, Will Ogden. The play tells the story of Katharine (Daly), who, 20 years after her son’s death, shows up at the door of his former lover, Cal. Cal and his family challenge Katharine to confront the truths of their shared past, as well as a future she never imagined. Mothers and Sons premiered at Bucks County Playhouse in June 2013, starring Daly, Steggert, Manoel Felciano and Grayson Taylor. Tyne Dalylast_img read more

Will Eno’s The Open House, Opens Off-Broadway

first_imgThe world premiere of Will Eno’s new off-Broadway play The Open House officially opens March 3 at The Romulus Linney Courtyard at the Pershing Square Signature Center. Directed by Oliver Butler and starring Carolyn McCormick and Peter Friedman, the show will run through March 23. Related Shows The cast will also feature Hannah Bos and Michael Countryman and Danny McCarthy. Show Closed This production ended its run on March 30, 2014 Ever enigmatic Pulitzer Prize finalist Eno’s new play is described as follows: “Playwrights have been trying to write Family Plays for a long time. And typically these plays try to answer endlessly complicated questions of blood and duty and inheritance and responsibility. They try to answer the question, ‘Can things really change?’ People have been trying nobly for years and years to have plays solve in two hours what hasn’t been solved in many lifetimes. This has to stop.” The Open House View Commentslast_img read more

Housewives Fave NeNe Leakes Parties Like It’s 1987 at Rock of Ages

first_imgNeNe Leakes went into a total ‘80s time warp on April 10! The Real Housewives of Atlanta star took a trip to Broadway to catch the headbanging jukebox hit Rock of Ages—and obviously, she had “nothin’ but a good time” while rocking out with the stars. After the show, she went backstage to meet the cast and get a behind-the-scenes tour! Check out this Hot Shot of Leakes chilling with the Rock of Ages crew (in some very cool shoes), then see the totally awesome face-melting musical on Broadway at the Helen Hayes Theatre. Rock of Ages View Comments Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 18, 2015last_img

A Celebration of the Life of Daniel James McClung Benefit Will Play 54 Below

first_img In addition to O’Malley, Murney and Barber (Wicked), the benefit will include performances from The Skivvies (Lauren Molina and Nick Cearley), Chelsea Packard, Jason Michael Snow, Tamika Sonja Lawrence, Dana Steingold, Joelle Lurie and Michael Zahler. The evening will feature the music of Judy Garland and Ella Fitzgerald, re-imagined. View Comments McClung passed away on January 5 after a fire broke out in the Strand Condominium. He was 27 years old. His husband, Michael Cohen, suffered smoke inhalation while attempting to escape. McClung’s plays include Inamorato, Flimsy Things and The Paper Nautilus, which were workshopped with Rattlestick Playwrights Theater, PS 122 and AliveWire Theatrics. To learn more about the memorial scholarship fund, and to make a donation, visit AlwaysForDaniel.com.center_img Rory O’Malley, Julia Murney, Jenni Barber and more will perform at 54 Below to pay tribute to the late playwright Daniel James McClung, who passed away earlier this year in a high-rise fire at the Strand apartment building in Manhattan. Always For Daniel: A Celebration of the Life of Daniel James McClung will take place on June 2. Proceeds from the benefit will go to Muhlenberg College Theatre and Dance, McClung’s alma mater, where a scholarship will be established in his name.last_img read more